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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 10 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 4 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 3 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Browne or search for Thomas Browne in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
has pointed out that the prudential philosophy of Poor Richard's Almanac was rather a collection of popular wisdom than an original contribution; and when one has called attention to the special reasons for magnifying economic virtues in a community of impecunious colonists and pioneers; one may as well frankly acknowledge that there is nothing in the precepts of the great printer to shake a man's egotism like the shattering paradoxes of the Beatitudes nor like the Christian morals of Sir Thomas Browne to make his heart elate. Franklin had nothing of what pietists call a realizing sense of sin or of the need for mystical regeneration and justification-faculties so richly present in his contemporary Jonathan Edwards. His cool calculating reason, having surveyed the fiery battleground of the Puritan conscience, reported that things are properly forbidden because hurtful, not hurtful because forbidden. Guided by this utilitarian principle, he simplified his religion and elaborated hi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
ally discover the archipelago of Mardi, a paradise more rich and sultry than the Marquesas, which becomes, as the story proceeds, a crazy chaos of adventure and satirical allegory. In Mardi for the first time appear those qualities which made a French critic call Melville un Rabelais americain, his welter of language, his fantastic laughter, his tumultuous philosophies. He had turned, contemporaries said, from the plain though witty style of his first works to the gorgeous manner of Sir Thomas Browne; he had been infected, say later critics, with Carlylese. Whatever the process, he had surely shifted his interest from the actual to the abstruse and symbolical, and he never recovered from the dive into metaphysics which proved fatal to him as a novelist. It was, however, while on this perilous border that he produced the best of his, and one of the best of American, romances; it is the peculiar mingling of speculation and experience which lends Moby Dick (1851) its special power.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
a, 152 Brief remarks on the defence of the Halifax libel, etc., 128 Brillon, Mme., 100 Bristed, John, 293 British prison ship, the, 182 British review, the, 206 British spy in Boston, the, 237 n. Broker of Bogota, 222,224 Brook Farm, 339-340, 345 Brooke, Henry, 165 Brother Jonathan, 309 Brothers, Thomas, 207 Brougham, John, 232 Brown, Charles Brockden, 287-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. Browne, Sir, Thomas, 104, 322 Browning, 261, 264, 266, 268, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce, Oliver, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144