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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 20 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 18 4 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 16 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 10 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 10 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Browning or search for Browning in all documents.

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true. I as firmly believe it not to be true, and that it was not true was proved by the conduct of those persons after the result of the election was known, in their long-continued, persistent efforts to adjust this question, but it was refused. In regard to myself, those who knew me best, know that never, from the moment I first knew what the Constitution of my country was, did I ever utter one word or cherish one thought that was false to the Constitution and Union of the country. Mr. Browning, (rep.) of Ill., intended to vote for the resolution, but could not permit the remarks of the Senator from Kentucky to go unreplied to. The Senator had been allowed the largest liberty, and he has taken every opportunity to assail the President, but he had not heard a single word of denunciation against those who seized the property and assaulted the flag. He desired to know whether he approved the acts of South Carolina in attempting to withdraw from the Union, and the acts of those Sta
an one for its destruction. In all these complaints, in all these arraignments of the present Government for violation of law and disregard of the Constitution, have you heard, as was forcibly and eloquently said by the Senator from Illinois (Mr. Browning) before me, one word uttered against violations of the Constitution and the trampling under foot of law by the States or the party now making war upon the Government of the United States? Not a word, sir. The Senator enumerates what he calstitution. Have you heard any intimation of complaint from those Senators about this Southern Confederacy--this band of traitors to their country and country's institutions? I repeat, substantially, the language of the Senator from Illinois (Mr. Browning): Have you heard any complaint or alarm about violations of constitutional law on the other side? Oh, no! But we must stand still; the Government must not move while they are moving with a hundred thousand men; while they have the power to c