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James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Parson Brownlow or search for Parson Brownlow in all documents.

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ublesome to the north-east of McMinnville and east of the Caney Fork of the Cumberland, Brigadier-General Elliott, Chief of Cavalry, was ordered, November fourteenth, to establish his headquarters, with the First division of cavalry, at or near Alexandria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Hint Ridge, cast of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments from the First East-Tennessee and Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, attacked the rebel Colonel Murray on the twenty-sixth at Sparta, killing one, wounding two, and capturing ten of the enemy, including a lieutenant of Champ Ferguson's; he also captured a few horses and ammunition, and destroyed extensive salt-works used by the rebels. A company of scouts under Captain Brixir also encountered a party of guerrillas near Beersheba Springs, captured fifteen or twenty and
s removed their dead and wounded, and the occasion was improved to exchange the wounded of other occasions. Among ours, I note the gallant Major Byington, of the Second Michigan, who was wounded in the charge of his regiment upon the rebel works on Tuesday last. His wounds are severe, but not mortal. He speaks highly of the kindness of the rebel surgeons. Among the rebel officers killed was Colonel McElroy, of the Thirteenth Mississippi. His lieutenant, John O'Brian, a brother of Mrs. Parson Brownlow, is our prisoner. The rebels were posted on the fight between Grant and Bragg, and have two stories concerning it. As one of them agrees with ours, we believe that. As Longstreet has now tried the siege plan and the assault, and failed in both, we can conceive no further necessity for his longer residence in East-Tennessee, and if he be not gone to-morrow, we shall be unable to account for it. November 30--A. M.--It has been comparatively quiet this morning. A few shots have bee
In getting the wagons up the mountains, the General's shoulder was as good at a wheel as any man's. October sixth, we lay in camp making amends for the wear and tear while crossing the mountains. In the evening I obtained a pass of Major Alexander Magruder, a good officer and a gentleman, to go to Knoxville. We found every thing in better condition than we had anticipated. After riding about town a few minutes, to make a survey of its location, we inquired for the residence of Parson Brownlow, which we soon found on Cumberland street, just east of a bridge across First Creek, in the corporation designated as East-Knoxville. We could but look upon the silent domicile with reverence, though it is but a plain two-story frame, with portico, while on the east end, and above the windows, some grapevines wove their autumn wreath. At the west end is a smaller house — the old office of the Knoxville Whig--which is about six feet from the other; and between the two houses stand three lo