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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 8 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 16 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lincoln, Abraham 1809- (search)
a million and a half of votes. You cannot destroy that judgment and feeling—that sentiment—by breaking up the political organization which rallies around it. You can scarcely scatter and disperse an army which has been formed into order in the face of your heaviest fire; but if you could, how much would you gain by forcing the sentiment which created it out of the peaceful channel of the ballot-box into some other channel? What would that other channel probably be? Would the number of John Browns be lessened or enlarged by the operation? But you will break up the Union rather than submit to a denial of your constitutional rights. That has a somewhat reckless sound; but it would be palliated, if not fully justified, were we proposing, by the mere force of numbers, to deprive you of some right plainly written down in the Constitution. But we are proposing no such thing. When you make these declarations you have a specific and well-understood allusion to an assumed constitu
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
t, his devotion to the American idea,-- in its spirit which giveth life, not in its letter which is death, --may be clearly seen in a single sentence from one of his family: On leaving us the first time that he went to Kansas, he said, If it is so painful for us to part, with the hope of meeting again, how dreadful must be the separation for life of hundreds of poor slaves! He inspired every one of his family with this heroic Christianity. His sons were all .young fathers; John Browns, junior, every one. His son-in-law, also, was touched with the holy fire from the altar of the old man's soul. When William Thompson, He whom the party of Virginia gentlemen murdered in cold blood. writes a sister-in-law, talked of going to Harper's Ferry, his wife begged of him not to go, telling him that she was afraid he would be murdered: he said, O Mary, you do not think of any thing but self! What is my life in comparison to thousands of poor slaves in bondage? For John Br
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
t, his devotion to the American idea,-- in its spirit which giveth life, not in its letter which is death, --may be clearly seen in a single sentence from one of his family: On leaving us the first time that he went to Kansas, he said, If it is so painful for us to part, with the hope of meeting again, how dreadful must be the separation for life of hundreds of poor slaves! He inspired every one of his family with this heroic Christianity. His sons were all .young fathers; John Browns, junior, every one. His son-in-law, also, was touched with the holy fire from the altar of the old man's soul. When William Thompson, He whom the party of Virginia gentlemen murdered in cold blood. writes a sister-in-law, talked of going to Harper's Ferry, his wife begged of him not to go, telling him that she was afraid he would be murdered: he said, O Mary, you do not think of any thing but self! What is my life in comparison to thousands of poor slaves in bondage? For John Br
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: H. Clay Pate. (search)
ing close to each other, Captain Pate's company burned the store of a man named Winer, a German; the home at John Brown, Jr., in which, amongst a variety of household articles, a valuable library was consumed; and also the house of another of he Browns — for the old man had six grown sons; and also searched houses, men, and Free State settlers, and acted in a violent and lawless manner generally. Not being able to find Captain Brown, senior, at Ossawatomie, Pate's company and the troops started back for the Santa Fe road. In the long march that intervened, under a hot sun, the two Browns, now in charge of the Dragoons, and held without even the pretence of bogus law, were driven before the Dragoons, chained like beasts. For twenty-five miles they thus suffered under this outrageous inhumanity. Nor was this all. John Brown, Jr., who had been excited by the wild stories of murder told against his father, by their enemies, and who was of a sensitive mind, was unable to bear up agains
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
-says that he has no feeling about death on a scaffold, and believes that every act, even all the follies that led to this disaster, were decreed to happen ages before the world was made. The only anxiety he expressed was in regard to the circumstances of his family. He asked and obtained leave to add a postscript to a letter to his wife, telling her that he was to be hanged on the second of December, and requested that it should be directed to Mrs. John Brown, for there are some other widow Browns in North Elba. He speaks highly of his medical attendants, but rejects the offered counsel of all ministers who believe that slavery is right. He will die as fearlessly as he has lived. The visit of Judge Russell and his wife was not liked by the self-styled hospitable Virginians, but they were permitted to visit the jail unmolested by the populace, and were not uncourteously received. After the trial. The next Northern visitor — a Boston sculptor — who had come to take a like
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reply of Mrs. Child. (search)
f the British West Indies, and of the Rev. Mr. Bleby, long time a missionary in those islands, both before and after emancipation, you could not fail to be convinced that Cash is a more powerful incentive to labor than the Lash, and far safer also. One fact in relation to those islands is very significant. While the working people were slaves, it was always necessary to order out the military during the Christmas holidays; but, since emancipation, not a soldier is to be seen. A hundred John Browns might land there without exciting the slightest alarm. To the personal questions you ask me, I will reply in the name of all the women of New England. It would be extremely difficult to find any woman in our villages who does not sew for the poor, and watch with the sick, whenever occasion requires. We pay our domestics generous wages, with which they can purchase as many Christmas gowns as they please; a process far better for their characters, as well as our own, than to receive t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
additional ones to appease the ferocious and despotic South, relates to slavery, the sum of all villany —and to nothing else. Hence, he is for continuing to slaveholders the inhuman privilege of hunting their fugitive slaves in any part of the North. Hence, he is willing to vote for an amendment of the Constitution, declaring that under no circumstances shall Congress have the power to abolish or interfere with slavery in any State. Hence, his readiness to enact laws subjecting future John Browns to the punishment of death for seeking to deliver the slaves Bunker-Hill fashion, and after the example of Lafayette, Kosciusko, Pulaski, and DeKalb, as pertaining to our own Revolutionary struggle. Yet, in another speech delivered at Madison, Wisconsin, not long since, Mr. Seward solemnly declares: By no word, no act, no combination into which I might enter, shall any one human being of all the generations to which I belong, much less of any class of human beings of any race or kind
carts at work in his fortifications, and treats them with liberal doses of the lash. No, no, abolitionism is no part of their purpose; they pray us to believe that much. We take them at their word; it is no part of their purpose. Their hue and cry against the South on that subject was all for Buncombe. Mrs. Harriet Stowe is no longer their prophet; nor Ward Beecher their brother of a prophet. Butler and Ellsworth and Billy Wilson, are their new divinities; Garrison, Phillips, and the John Browns, give out that they are not interested in this fight, which is not for the slave, but for trade. It is a war waged for precisely the objects which inspired the Tories in the Revolution; a war of subjugation; a war to perpetuate the exaction of tribute; a war against the right of self-government; a war intended to crush out all the attributes of nationality belonging of right to the colonies of the South. Competent statisticians declare that the cost of the Union to the Southern Stat