Your search returned 51 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. did General R. E. Lee descend from Robert, the Bruce King of Scotland? --Professor William Winston Fontaine, in a paper read before the Louisville branch of the Southern Historical Society March 29th, 1881, which we hope before long to find space to publish in full, has shown very conclusively that through the Carters and Spotswoods our King of men was descended from the noble King Robert Bruce of Scotland; and that of the five heroes who particularly distinguished themselves on the glorious field of Bannockburn, in driving back the invader of their beloved country, Lee, through the same channel, was the direct descendant of four--namely: King Robert; Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray; Walter, the High Steward; and Sir Robert de Keith, Great Marischal of Scotland. Professor Fontaine cites a number of authorities, and deserves great credit for the industry he has shown in bringing out these interesting links in the lineage of our great chief, who was in himself
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
General Robert Edward Lee from King Robert the Bruce, of Scotland. by Professor Wm. Winston Fontained song of Roland. No-nor more stately was Robert Bruce on the eve of Bannockburn, when he struck dnia, was seventeenth in direct descent from Robert Bruce, of Scotland. More-over, that of the five the Lady Isabel, 1251. Their son, VII.--Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale, led, in 1264, a body ofof Gloucester. Their eldest son, VIII.--Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale, born about 1245, accompfallen in the holy war. The young crusader, Robert Bruce, who is said to have been by far the handsod appeased by the intervention of friends, and Bruce, in right of his Countess, became Earl of Carre October, 1292. Their oldest eon, IX.--Robert Bruce, King of Scotland, was born the 11th of Jul294, brought a noble body of men to the aid of Bruce. In the battle of Bannockburn he and his cous Buchanan thus writes of the Scottish hero: Robert Bruce, to express much in a few words, was undoub[2 more...]
icidal. Yet it would be difficult to show that the State of Florida, for example, a Spanish province, purchased for national purposes some forty years ago by the United States Government for several millions, and fortified and furnished with navy yards for national uses, at a national expense of many more millions, and numbering at this moment a population of only 80,000 white men, should be more entitled to resume its original sovereignty than the ancient kingdom of William the Lion and Robert Bruce. The terms of the treaty between England and Scotland were perpetual, and so is the Constitution of the United States. The United Empire may be destroyed by revolution and war, and so may the United States; but a peaceful and legal dismemberment without the consent of a majority of the whole people, is an impossibility. But it is sometimes said that the American Republic originated in secession from the mother country, and that it is unreasonable of the Union to resist the seceding
an a great number of ministers and their wives, and ladies of the Anti-Slavery Society, besides our party, and the friends whom I have mentioned before. All seemed to be enjoying themselves. After tea they sang a few verses of the seventysecond psalm in the old Scotch version. April 17. To-day a large party of us started on a small steamer to go down the Clyde. It was a trip full of pleasure and incident. Now we were shown the remains of old Cardross Castle, where it was said Robert Bruce breathed his last. And now we came near the beautiful grounds of Roseneath, a green, velvet-like peninsula, stretching out into the widening waters. Somewhere about here I was presented, by his own request, to a broad-shouldered Scotch farmer, who stood some six feet two, and who paid me the compliment to say that he had read my book, and that he would walk six miles to see me any day. Such a flattering evidence of discriminating taste, of course, disposed my heart towards him; but wh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
f Baron Alderson. She died in 1857, surviving many years her husband, Lord Gifford, who was successively Solicitor-General, Attorney-General, Lord Chief-Justice of the Common Pleas, and Master of the Rolls. the dowager, last Sunday; he is without words, conversation, heart, or a disposition to please, throwing nothing into the stock of social intercourse, and keeping himself aloof from all the hearty currents of life. I ought to tell you that my host at present is a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce (of which he boasts much), and also of the famous Sir Thomas Craig, of the times of James I., who wrote that venerable folio on Jus Feudale, in which I have whilom moiled, and who died in the house where I now am. His accomplished family have all read Mr. Prescott's book with the greatest interest, and have made earnest inquiries after his health and the present condition of his eyes. They first read the book, being interested in the subject, without knowing it to be that of an American.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers, and soldiers who died as prisoners. (search)
.,Oct. 11, 1864. Brown, John,*11th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 23, 1864. Brown, Leonard S.,56th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 14, 1864. Brown, Lucius,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 30, 1864. Brown, William,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 11, 1864. Brown, William S.,1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Brownell, Andrew J.,58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Browning, George D.,25th Mass. Inf.,Charleston, S. C.,Sept. 17, 1864. Bruce, Robert,36th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,June 9, 1864. Bryant, Francis M.,39th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Jan. 29, 1865. Bryant, George,32d Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 27, 1864. Bryant, George W.,12th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Dec. 25, 1862. Bryant, Lyman,57th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,July 27, 1864. Bryant, Winslow A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 26, 1864. Bryson, Thomas,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Nov. 7, 1864. Buchanan, John,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sep
.,Oct. 11, 1864. Brown, John,*11th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 23, 1864. Brown, Leonard S.,56th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sept. 14, 1864. Brown, Lucius,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 30, 1864. Brown, William,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 11, 1864. Brown, William S.,1st Mass. Cav.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Brownell, Andrew J.,58th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 25, 1864. Browning, George D.,25th Mass. Inf.,Charleston, S. C.,Sept. 17, 1864. Bruce, Robert,36th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,June 9, 1864. Bryant, Francis M.,39th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Jan. 29, 1865. Bryant, George,32d Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Nov. 27, 1864. Bryant, George W.,12th Mass. Inf.,Richmond, Va.,Dec. 25, 1862. Bryant, Lyman,57th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,July 27, 1864. Bryant, Winslow A.,2d Mass. H. A.,Andersonville, Ga.,Aug. 26, 1864. Bryson, Thomas,20th Mass. Inf.,Salisbury, N. C.,Nov. 7, 1864. Buchanan, John,27th Mass. Inf.,Andersonville, Ga.,Sep
Brown, L. S., 502 Brown, Lucius, 502 Brown, Nathaniel, 338 Brown, O. G., 444 Brown, Samuel, 338 Brown, Seva, 338 Brown, Sheppard, 338 Brown, Thomas, 2d Mass. Inf., 338 Brown, Thomas, 58th Mass. Inf., 338 Brown, W. S., 502 Brown, William, 1st Mass. H. A., 444 Brown, William, 2d Mass. H. A., 502 Browne, Albert, 7 Browne, C. D., 152 Browne, L. S., 444 Brownell, A. J., 502 Brownell, D. M., 338 Browning, G. D., 502 Browning, H. A., 444 Broze, John, 338 Bruce, D. R., 444 Bruce, Robert, 502 Brundage, L. A., 443 Bryan, Peter, 338 Bryant, A. S., 48, 49 Bryant, A. T., 338 Bryant, D. W., 444 Bryant, E. G., 490 Bryant, E. K., 444 Bryant, F. M., 502 Bryant, G. W., 502 Bryant, George, 502 Bryant, J. H., 444 Bryant, John, 1st Mass. H. A., 338 Bryant, John, 18th Mass. Inf., 338 Bryant, Lyman, 502 Bryant, S. C., 444 Bryant, W. A., 502 Bryant, W. E., Jr., 338 Bryant, W. W., 445 Bryson, Thomas, 502 Bubler, J. B., 502 Buchanan, Archibald, 445 Buchanan, Frank
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), chapter 11 (search)
f. Sergeants, Howard H. Kinsey, Henry A. Wile. Corporals, Wilbur J. Rolph, John W. Latham, Jos. C. Shorb. Company K—Captain, Geo. R. Gaither, Gus. W. Dorsey, N. C. Hobbs. First-Lieutenant, Rudolphus Cecil, George Howard. Second-Lieutenant, E. H. D. Pue, Samuel W. Dorsey, George Howard, Ridgely Brown, Thomas Griffith, Frank A. Bond. First-Sergeant, Robert Floyd. Sergeants, W. H. Wright, Geo. Buckingham, Ira Albaugh, W. W. Burgess. Corporals, F. Leo Wills, William Barnes, B. H. Morgan, Robert Bruce, James Oliver. Some of the actions in which the First Maryland cavalry was engaged: Kernstown, Maurytown, Greenland Gap, Oakland, Morgantown, Bridgeport, Cairo, Middletown, Winchester, Hagerstown, Morton's Ford, Brandy Station, Auburn or Cedar Creek, Buckland, Gainesville, Taylorsville, Pollard's Farm, Old Church, Beaver Dam, Dabney's Ferry, Ashland, Trevilian's Station, Leetown, Bladensburg, Rockville, Poolesville, Gettysburg, Martinsburg, Charlestown, Bunker Hill, Fisher's Hill, Madi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the ear only as a name, and the heroic defence of Carthage, when the women of that devoted city plaited their long tresses into bow-strings for the archers, and beat their jewels into arrow points, remains among the inspirations of history. Or, to take more modern instance, England made the literature of her time—Scotland made none; England conquered—Scotland was overcome; and yet none remembers the victorious Edward——he has passed and is forgotten—but the names of William Wallace and Robert Bruce are graven ineffaceably upon the Chronicles of Nations and the story of their deeds and their sufferings have been strangely intertwined with all that is noblest and best in human action. Nothing lives, either in story or in song, but that which appeals to the heart of humanity; and nothing on God's earth so moves the sympathies of man as when the weak are seen defending their honor, their principles or their homes—against the strong. The instincts of man incline to the overpower
1 2