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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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ieutenants Phillips and Marable, 4; non-commissioned officers and privates, 114. Total, 172. Thirty-first Regiment Georgia Volunteers.--Killed: Non-commissioned officers and privates, 29. Wounded: Lieutenants Johnson, Harrison, Bozeman, and Brunson, 4; non-commissioned officers and privates, 137. Total, 170. Total killed, 106; wounded, 386. Aggregate, 492. The battle of Malvern Hill. headquarters Fourth brigade, Valley District, near Gordonsville, July 28, 1862. Captain A. S. d by the dead and dying. I grieve to state that the list of killed and wounded in this battle is large. Lieutenant Plunket, company H, was shot twice, and gloriously died on the field. Major Carter, Captains Brown, Taggart, and Croft, Lieutenants Brunson, O. W. Allen, Stephens, McCarley, Darrah, and Carter, were wounded; besides many others killed and wounded — a list of whom is hereto attached. Some have since died. The whole regiment acted in the most satisfactory manner; and where all
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
their leaving the camp near Fredericksburg on the 15th June, to their return to Culpeper Courthouse on the 27th day of July. The battalion of Lieutenant-Colonel Garnett was ordered to report to Major-General Heth, and Major Poague to Major-General Pender, and the battalion of Lieutenant-Colonel Cutts, under command of Major Lane, to Major-General Anderson, for duty with their divisions. With Major McIntosh's and Major Pegram's battalions of this corps, which was under the command of Captain Brunson until I was joined by Major Pegram, who assumed command on the 30th June at Cashtown, Pennsylvania, I left camp on the morning of the 16th and accompanied the Third corps to Cashtown, in Pennsylvania, where I arrived on the 30th June, and on the morning of the 1st July I assumed command of all the artillery of the corps, which had made the march to that place without loss, except that of Lieutenant Chamberlayne, of the Crenshaw battery, and four of his men, who were captured by the enem
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Organization of army of Northern Virginia. (search)
of companies20 Third corps---Colonel R. Lindsay Walker.   20-lb. Parrotts.10-lb. Parrotts.3-inch Rifles.Napoleons.12-lb. Howitzers.24-lb. Howitzers.Other Guns. Maj. D. G. McIntoshHurt  2    Whitworth.2 Maj. W. F. PoagueRice   4     Luck  4      Johnson  22    10 rifles; 6 Napoleons.         Lt. Col. GarnettLewis 13     Major RichardsonMaurin 122     Moore 112     Grandy  2 2   11 rifles; 4 Naps.; 2 Hows.         Major CutshawWyatt 1122    Woolfolk    4    Brookes   31   2 rifles; 5 Naps.; 7 Hows.         Maj. Willie J. PegramBrunson  3 1    Davidson   31    Crenshaw 21      McGraw   4     Marye 2 2    8 rifles; 9 Naps.; 2 Hows.         Lt. Col. CuttsWingfield23     Whitworth.1 Major LaneRoss 311     Patterson   24   10 rifles; 3 Naps.; 4 Hows.           214222715 3 Total number of rifles
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 17 (search)
suggested of erecting a monument on the Capitol grounds at the Capitol of the State never took shape until 1886, when Mr. Luther Manship made the first effort toward doing something to start the monument by giving a concert and devoting the proceeds to that purpose. Soon after this the ladies organized the Confederate Monument Association. There were only nine ladies present at the first meeting. Mrs. Sallie B. Morgan presided at this meeting. Mrs. C. E. Hooker was elected president; Mrs. Brunson, vice-president; Miss Andrews, treasurer; Miss Fontaine, secretary; and Mrs. Manship, corresponding secretary. While the officers of the association were changed from time to time on account of the removal from the city, or other unavoidable reasons, the organization continued to grow, and was chartered under the laws of the State on March 17, 1887. An executive committee, consisting of Mrs. C. E. Hooker, Mrs. W. W. Stone, Mrs. Nugent, and Mrs. Dunning, was appointed, and under their le