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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Brunt or search for Brunt in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
trate them. The main channel for entering the Sounds was Hatteras Inlet, and here the enemy had thrown up heavy earthworks to protect the most important smuggling route then in operation; for, although Charleston and Mobile were considered important ports for smuggling supplies to the South, Hatteras Inlet was none the less so. For the purpose of capturing the defences of Hatteras Inlet a squadron under command of Commodore Stringham was fitted out. It consisted of the Minnesota, Captain Van Brunt, Wabash, Captain Mercer, Monticello, Commander J. P. Gillis, Susquehanna, Captain Chauncey, Pawnee, Commander Rowan, Cumberland, Captain Marston, and the Revenue Steamer Harriet Lane, Captain Faunce. Three transports accompanied the squadron The Adelaide, Commander Stellwagen, George Peabody, Lieut.-Commanding Lowry, and the Fanny, Lieut.-Commanding Crosby. They carried about 900 troops under command of Major-General B. F. Butler. On the 27th of August, 1861, the day after leavi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
me there was at anchor in Hampton Roads, off Fortress Monroe, the Minnesota, of forty guns, Capt. Van Brunt; Roanoke, of forty guns, Capt. Marston; St. Lawrence, fifty guns, Capt. Purviance; and seveHis account of affairs was correct as has since been proved, but when the man was taken to Captain Van Brunt, that officer questioned him fiercely and then roughly dismissed him, as if he considered ammunition, and their first idea was to proceed again to the attack of the Minnesota. By Capt. Van Brunt's account, the Merrimac and the two Confederate gun-boats did head towards his ship, and reto destroy the Minnesota, determined that she should not fall into the hands of the enemy. Capt. Van Brunt goes on to say: A short time after the Merrimac and her consorts had changed their course, se in the squadron at Hampton Roads, so far as known, says anything about the matter except Capt. Van Brunt, who writes: For some time after this the Confederates concentrated their whole battery upo