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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The balloons with the army of the Potomac: a personal reminiscence by Professor T. S. C. Lowe, who introduced and made balloon observations on the Peninsula for the Union army. (search)
rates by watching their Confederate battery at Yorktown which fired upon the Federal balloonist and upon which balloon Bryan looked down Captain John Randolph Bryan, aide-de-Camp to General J. B. Magruder, then commanding the Army of the PeninCaptain John Randolph Bryan, aide-de-Camp to General J. B. Magruder, then commanding the Army of the Peninsula near Yorktown, Virginia, made three balloon trips in all above the wonderful panorama of the Chesapeake Bay, the York and the James Rivers, Old Point Comfort and Hampton, the fleets lying in both the York and the James, and the two opposing armion, braving the shells and shrapnel of the Union batteries, and his fellow-soldiers nicknamed the young aeronaut Balloon Bryan. On his final trip, made just before Williamsburg, May 5, 1862, the rope which held him to the earth entangled a soldiera half-moon circuit of about fifteen miles, about four miles of which was over the York River. The information which Captain Bryan was able to give General Johnston as to the roads upon which the Federals were moving enabled him to prepare for an a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
it has been the object of the Times-Dispatch to record as many as possible of these in the Confederate column of this paper. The following account of Capt. John Randolph Bryan's trips in a war balloon, while attached to General J. B. Magruder's headquarter's before Yorktown, we consider as well deserving publication, as it was the Confederates in order to ascertain the position and strength of the Union forces. It will add to the interest of this narrative to know that at the time Capt. Bryan was making his ascensions from the Confederate lines General Fitz John Porter was performing the same service for the Union army which lay facing the Confederates. His experience was similar to that of Captain Bryan's, in that his balloon rope broke and his balloon also drifted aimlessly in the air. General Porter's balloon was a much more expensive affair than the one the Confederates could afford, and was attached to the ground by a silken rope. Although General Porter escaped with