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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
e guns: so, when they advanced, shouting, to within thirty yards of our troops, they rose and let them have it. Nine-tenths of the enemy fell, and the rest were soon dispatched, before they could get away. One of their dying officers said they would have surrendered to us, if we had demanded it. He was reminded of Pope's beastly orders, and died with a horrible groan. August 12 Pope claims a victory! So did McClellan. But truth will rise, in spite of everything. I will not quote Bryant literally, because he is an enemy in this war, and falsifies his own precepts. August 13 McClellan is gone, bag and baggage, abandoning his base; to attain which, he said he had instituted his magnificent strategic movements, resulting in an unmolested retreat from the Peninsula and flight to Washington, for the defense of his own capital. So the truth they crushed to earth on the Chickahominy has risen again, and the Yankees, like the Cretans, are to be known henceforth as a nation o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
ume I. who, as we have observed, had early espoused the cause of the conspirators. See page 374, volume I. There appeared to be sufficient evidence of these works having been employed in the interest of the rebellion to warrant their destruction, and they were laid. in ashes. Nothing remained of them, when the writer passed by the spot in the spring of 1866, but three tall chimneys, ruined machinery, and heaps of brick. On the 19th, the commodore, with the gun-boats Cairo, Lieutenant-commanding Bryant, and Conestoga, Lieutenant-commanding Phelps, ascended Fort Bruce and its vicinity. the National troops completed the work and named it Fort Bruce, in honor of the loyal Colonel Bruce, of Nashville. The engraving shows its situation at the bend of the Cumberland, about half a mile below Clarkesville. It commanded the River up and down. The mouth of the Red River is seen at the center of the picture, near a storehouse. On the Clarksville side of that stream was a small red
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
onal standard was hoisted over the works the next morning. The fugitives went down the river in transports, accompanied by the Confederate fleet. Fort Randolph was also evacuated, and Colonel Ellet, whose ram fleet was in advance of the now pursuing flotilla, raised the flag over that stronghold likewise. June 5. The same evening the flotilla of gun-boats Benton, Captain Phelps; Carondelet, Captain Walke; St. Louis, Lieutenant-commanding McGonigle; Louisville, Captain Dove; Cairo, Lieutenant Bryant. anchored at about a mile and a half above Memphis, and the ram fleet These consisted of the Monarch Queen of the West, Lioness, Switzerland, Mingo, Lancaster No. 3, Fulton, Hornet, and Samson, all under the general command of Colonel Ellet. a little farther up the river. The Confederate fleet, It consisted of the General Van Dorn (Hollins's flagship), General Price, General Bragg, General Lovell, Little Rebel, Jeff. Thompson, Sumter, and General Beauregard. now commanded by Com
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
3. he opened a furious cannonade from his batteries in advance of Armstrong's. This was answered by Roemer's battery, on College Hill, and was soon followed by a tremendous yell from the Confederates, as they rushed forward at the double-quick to storm the fort. The storming party consisted of three brigades of General McLaws's division — Wolford's, Cobb's, and Phillips's, all Georgians; General Humphreys's brigade of Mississippians, and a brigade composed of the remains of Anderson's and Bryant's, consisting of South Carolina and Georgia regiments. The leader of the Mississippi troops was the present (1868) Governor Humphreys, of Mississippi. These were picked men, the flower of Longstreet's army; and, in obedience to orders, one brigade pressed forward to the close assault, two brigades supporting it, while two others watched the National line, and kept up a continual fire. The tumult was awful for a few minutes, for it was composed of the yells of voices, the rattle of musketry
m. Foote, with the gunboats Conestoga and Cairo, moved up Feb. 19. the Cumberland from Donelson, three days after its surrender. At Clarksville, he found the railroad bridge destroyed; while the wealthier citizens had generally fled, and he encountered no resistance. As it would have been absurd to attack a city like Nashville with such a force, he now returned to Cairo for additional boats; while Gen. Smith, with the advance of our victorious army, marched up to Clarksville; whence Lieut. Bryant, of the Cairo, followed by 7 transports, conveying the brigade of Gen. Nelson, moved up thle river to Nashville, where they arrived on the 24th, but found no enemy prepared to resist them. In fact, the city had virtually surrendered already to the 4th Ohio cavalry, Col. John Kennett, being the advance of Buell's army. Col. Kennett had reached Edgefield Junction, 8 or 10 miles from Nashville, and thence sent forward a detachment, under Maj. H. C. Rodgers, who occupied without resistance
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
s instructions of March 31st, with one section of Captain Muench's Minnesota Battery, two twelve-pound howitzers, a detachment of Fifth Ohio Cavalry of one hundred and fifty men, under Major Ricker, and two battalions of infantry from the Fifty-seventh and Seventy-seventh Ohio, under the command of Colonels Ilildebrand and Mungen, I marched to the river, and embarked on the steamers Empress and Tecumseh. The gunboat Cairo did not arrive at Pittsburg, until after midnight, and at 6 A. M. Captain Bryant, commanding the gunboat, notified me that he was ready to proceed up the river. I followed, keeping the transports within about three hundred yards of the gunboat. About 1 P. M., the Cairo commenced shelling the battery above the mouth of Indian Creek, but elicited no reply. She proceeded up the river steadily and cautiously, followed close by the Tyler and Lexington, all throwing shells at the points where, on former visits of the gunboats, enemy's batteries were found. In this orde
. 79 Brownell, Katy, D. 45 Brownell, Martha Francis, D. 45 Brownlow, Parson, his definition of the height of impudence, P. 26; his reply to Gen. Pillow, P. 60; anecdote of the daughter of, P. 109 Bryan, M. K., Col., D. 39 Bryant, Mr., of S. C., D. 13 Bryant, Lieut., U. S. N., D. 73 Bryce, —, Col., D. 37 Buchanan, James, President of U. S., D. 7; receives Hayne of S. C., D. 14; notice of, D. 59; correspondence with Floyd, Doc. 10; correspondence with the SouthBryant, Lieut., U. S. N., D. 73 Bryce, —, Col., D. 37 Buchanan, James, President of U. S., D. 7; receives Hayne of S. C., D. 14; notice of, D. 59; correspondence with Floyd, Doc. 10; correspondence with the South Carolina Commissioners, Doc. 11; recommendation for a fast, Dec. 14, 1860, Doc. 17; agitated at the surrender of Federal arms, P. 8; favors the secessionists, P. 9; not to reinforce the forts, P. 9; his administration a reign of stealing, P. 23; his favorites, conspirators, P. 24; another Abou-Ben-Adhem, P. 38; blabs all he knows, P. 39; New York women's letter to, P. 42; his early knowledge of the secession conspiracy, P. 110; Twiggs' letter to, P. 131 Buckingham, —, Gov. of Conn., procl<
ar, would require volumes. But it would be unfair not to recall the names of a few, whose services may have been of no whit greater value than those of others, who, for lack of space, must remain unmentioned, but whose professional standing during and after the war was such as to render them worthy of selection as representatives of the great volunteer medico-military class to which they belonged. Among such may be mentioned the names of Doctors Agnew, Ashhurst, Bacon, Bartholow, Bowditch, Bryant, Buck, Da Costa, Gouley, Gross, Hamilton, Hodgen, Pancoast, Shrady, Tyson, and Weir. Under the agreement of the Geneva Convention, medical officers are now officially neutralized. This status cannot free them from the dangers of battle, in which they, of course, must share, but operates to exempt them from retention as prisoners The boats that brought medical supplies The upper photograph was taken about a mile above City Point. The supply-boat Planter, a familiar sight to sol
ar, would require volumes. But it would be unfair not to recall the names of a few, whose services may have been of no whit greater value than those of others, who, for lack of space, must remain unmentioned, but whose professional standing during and after the war was such as to render them worthy of selection as representatives of the great volunteer medico-military class to which they belonged. Among such may be mentioned the names of Doctors Agnew, Ashhurst, Bacon, Bartholow, Bowditch, Bryant, Buck, Da Costa, Gouley, Gross, Hamilton, Hodgen, Pancoast, Shrady, Tyson, and Weir. Under the agreement of the Geneva Convention, medical officers are now officially neutralized. This status cannot free them from the dangers of battle, in which they, of course, must share, but operates to exempt them from retention as prisoners The boats that brought medical supplies The upper photograph was taken about a mile above City Point. The supply-boat Planter, a familiar sight to sol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
an, Richard Wilson, John B. Gold and James Belcher. Company K--Sergeants G. W. Morrison and C. C. Marshall; Privates John Burlington, E. H. Estes, R. J. Hatcher and John R. Billings; Corporal R. C. Fortune (killed). (The officers commanding Companies A, B, E and F are now absent, wounded; they may have names to present hereafter.) Second Florida. Company A--Sergeant Riley (distinguished both at Seven Pines and at Williamsburg); Corporal Rasson; Musician Cushman; Privates Bradley, Bryant, Hooper, Kennedy and Reed (special case). Company B--Lieutenants Jenkins and Thompson; Privates Finley, Crosby, Colson, Tidwell, Parker and Malphus; Sergeant Williams, Color-Bearer. Company C--Corporal J. B. Cason; Privates Gathegan, Wilkinson, Cone and Miller. Company D--Lieutenant Parker (who captured the colors of the Eighth New York); Sergeant Stephens; Privates Rawls, Morrison and Waller. Company E--Captain McCaslin; Lieutenant Reynolds (dead); Sergeant Roberts; Coroporals
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