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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles B. Buchanan or search for Charles B. Buchanan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
of the dead and living who at any time during the war served in the company: William Adams, James Y. Anderson, John Y. Anderson, Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, H. W. Bagley, D. S. Black, William Black, A. M. Brown, Charles B. Buchanan, William Brownlee, Jno. Brownlee, S. Balser, James Breedlove, Thomas Chittum, John Chittum, Z. J. Culton, Joseph Culton, John Campbell, William Davis, L. P. Davis, David Dice, George W. Dice, John Dice, Archibald Davis, Andrew Ervin, James864; Samuel B. Walker and James H. Wilson, April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse; M. X. White, shot by Hunter's command near Lexington, while a prisoner, in 1864. Died During War—Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, Charles B. Buchanan, Z. J. Colton, William B. Firebaugh, Henry Firebaugh, Joseph Kinnear, Robert Sterret, Alexander Stuart. The following died in prison: H. W. Patterson, Cyrus Patterson, John Henry Mackey, Gideon Marks, William Brownlee, William Black. W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ng the shallow Mint—Bureau plan of Mr. Secretary Corwin—an echo of the British system of coinage, not offensively, but simply ignoring it—he formulated a measure regulating the coinage, which passed the Senate unanimously, without debate, precisely as he wrote it and upon his sole ipse dixit. Next, but after some delay, this identical measure passed the House of Representatives and became a law in February, 1853—to remain the law of the land without question or cavil from Presidents Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln, Johnson and Grant. Such was his power in the United States Senate in a period of fierce party strife on a great organic and economic question, opposing, as he did then, the Secretary's recommendation. I have heard or read this coinage debate from 1874, when it began, till now, over twenty years of parliamentary struggle, and if I were called upon to name a document which best expounds the true principles of finance and statesmanship on this difficult subject, and in a perfectl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
ingered upon his fascinating theme, dwelling with infinite charm upon days that seem in this practical, money-making age, like gleanings from the pages of knight errantry and romance. And then he spoke of the stirring events that came with the years, and finally of that great, sad struggle, that swept over the Southland, burying the old life forever in its course. Of the causes that led up to that struggle, he spoke freely. He went over the intervening years when he was appointed by President Buchanan, United States District Attorney for Louisiana, and how he resigned this office in 1859, to accept the Attorney Generalship of the State. In January, 1861, events were rushing forward, and he was elected a member of the convention which passed the secession ordinance, January 26, 1861. I was a member of the committee of fifteen, which drafted this ordinance, said Mr. Semmes. And somewhere carefully put away, added Mrs. Semmes, I have still the pen with which you signed that ordinan