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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 17 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 25 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 14 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 15 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Buchanan or search for Buchanan in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

ding to support Fillmore it was kept alive by Buchanan men and other kindred spirits, who were somewmore's chance of being President. Suppose Buchanan gets all the slave States and Pennsylvania anwo slave States of Maryland and Kentucky then Buchanan is not elected; Fillmore goes into the House nois' it Will inevitably give these States to Buchanan, which will more than compensate him for the take it and thus keep it out of the hands of Buchanan. Be not deceived. Buchanan is the hard horsBuchanan is the hard horse to beat in this race. Let him have Illinois, and nothing can beat him; and he will get Illinois i over seventy newspapers in Illinois opposing Buchanan, only three or four of which support Mr. Fillidate they were really aiding the election of Buchanan. But the effort proved unavailing, for in spung tenaciously to their leader, resulting in Buchanan's election. The vote in Illinois stood, BuchBuchanan 105,344, Fremont 96,180, and Fillmore 37,451. At the same time Bissell was elected governor by
nominated Senator. the house-divided against-itself speech. reading it to his friends. their comments and complaints. Douglas's first speech in Chicago. the joint canvass. Lincoln and Douglas contrasted. Lincoln on the stump. positions of Lincoln and Douglas. incidents of the debate. The result. more letters from Horace Greeley. how Lincoln accepted his defeat. a specimen of his oratory. I shall be forced to omit much that happened during the interval between the election of Buchanan and the campaign of 1858, for the reason that it would not only swell this work to undue proportions, but be a mere repetition of what has been better told by other writers. It is proper to note in passing, however, that Mr. Lincoln's reputation as a political speaker was no longer bounded by the border lines of Illinois. It had passed beyond the Wabash, the Ohio, and the Mississippi rivers, and while his pronounced stand on the slavery question had increased the circle of his admirers in
. In the few unoccupied moments allotted him, he was carefully revising his inaugural address. On the morning of the 4th of March he rode from his hotel with Mr. Buchanan in an open barouche to the Capitol. There, slightly pale and nervous, he was introduced to the assembled multitude by his old friend Edward D. Baker, and in administered by the venerable Chief Justice Taney, and he was now clothed with all the powers and privileges of Chief Magistrate of the nation. He accompanied Mr. Buchanan to the White House and here the historic bachelor of Lancaster bade him farewell, bespeaking for him a peaceful, prosperous, and successful administration. a poultice, thrusting the old-fashioned standing collar up to the ears, dressed in black throughout, with swallow-tail coat not of the newest style. It was President Buchanan, calling to take his successor to the Capitol. In a few minutes he reappeared, with Mr. Lincoln on his arm; the two took seats side-by-side, and the carria