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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 17 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 25 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 14 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 15 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Buchanan or search for Buchanan in all documents.

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Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, IV. (search)
itary services. The year at Galena was more than ever isolated. His quiet judgment, however, seems to have been wide-awake. He went to hear Douglas during the campaign of this year, and, being asked how he liked him, answered, He is a very able, at least a very smart man. And from having been a Democrat--so far as he was definitely anything political — his change of view dates from this occasion. The words of Douglas caused him to rejoice over Lincoln's election. Except his vote for Buchanan, his single political manifestation previous to this had been to join the Know-Nothings at St. Louis, and attend one meeting. But now he had listened to Douglas, and preferred Lincoln; and South Carolina had seceded. The state of the country became his one thought. It is interesting to reflect that South Carolina, the first state to leave the Union, sent one man in thirty-eight to the Revolution, while Grant's ancestral state, Connecticut, furnished one man in seven, or five times as man