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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 17 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 25 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 14 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 15 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Buchanan or search for Buchanan in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
not tell you that he is coming to make you a visit, but you may be glad to know that he is unchanged, and as active as ever. He says he intends to go and see Mr. Buchanan. I hope he will. It may do good to have the relations they stood in maintained, if Buchanan becomes President, as I suppose he will . . . . We have, as yoBuchanan becomes President, as I suppose he will . . . . We have, as you will infer from what I have said, rather than from any details I have given, been very busy since I saw you last. Indeed, it seems incredible, that we have been absent from home only seven weeks, and yet have come so far, and done so much. London life seems to me to have become more oppressive than it ever was. The breakfasts,erfully. Mr. Fillmore left a most agreeable impression here. The King was delighted with him, and told me he would vote for him for President. I replied, that Buchanan would get the election, notwithstanding his Majesty's vote. Well, he answered, never mind, I am glad we are of the same party, and you may always count upon my
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
h the details and confidence I should if I were at home. But I am, perhaps, more cool than I should be if I were in the midst of the domestic discussion, though certainly I have less connaissance de causes. I do not, indeed, see far ahead. Mr. Buchanan has made his Cabinet, and it is as good and conservative a cabinet as could have been expected from his position. . . . . The country, too, is quiet, and the new government will begin without a fierce or indiscriminate opposition to its measurhat will soon be settled. I think it likely they will, and that we shall have a sectional excitement within two years fiercer than the one that preceded the late Presidential election . . . . . That any degree of wisdom and integrity can make Mr. Buchanan's administration of the country other than dangerous to our peace, both domestic and foreign, I do not believe. To W. H. Prescott. Florence, May 8, 1857. my dear William,—I have to thank you for two most agreeable mementos of kindness;
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
nes are not yet sufficiently formed and organized to be intelligible. The great contest, as you know, is about Kansas. Buchanan has behaved as badly as possible about it; the leaders of the Free Soil party no better. Both have treated it as a game, I know you do. But I pray you to believe as little of it as you can. I have never belonged to the party that brought Mr. Buchanan into power, and never expect to sustain its measures on any national subject. Still, I do not impute to Mr. Buchanan Mr. Buchanan all the political extravagances that are sometimes charged on him by my more ardent friends. That he desires the extension of slavery I much doubt. That he cannot succeed in extending it, if he desire so to do, I feel sure. Be persuaded, I pray yo fashion you understand so well from autopsy. . . . . When we talked about our affairs in 1856-57, I easily foresaw that Buchanan would be chosen; that this would lead to no trouble with the governments of Europe, that Walker would fail as a flibuste
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
izing a State movement to collect funds, which shall be systematically applied when the resources of this first enthusiasm begin to fail. . . . . Thus far it has been, on our part, a sort of crusade. But the regular armies will soon be ready to follow. Through the whole of the last six months, you see the working of our political institutions most strikingly. The people is the practical sovereign, and, until the people had been appealed to, and had moved, the Administration, whether of Buchanan or of Lincoln, could act with little efficiency. We drifted. Now the rudder is felt. Maryland must yield, or become a battle-ground over which the opposing forces will roll their floods alternately. Baltimore must open her gates, or the city will be all but razed. At least, so far we seem to see ahead. But the people, the sovereign, came to the rescue at the last moment. . . . . Now the movement—partly from having been so long delayed and restrained—is become absolute and impetuous,