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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 17 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 25 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 14 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 15 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Buchanan or search for Buchanan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
the residence of his old friend, Houghawout, he said to him, Good-by, Huck, I am gone up, and marched on to the place of his assassination with the firmness and fortitude of a stoic. He had no trial, and it is presumed that he was shot by the order of David Hunter. The fight at Lynchburg. After remaining in Lexington three days, the Yankees departed, with Lynchburg as their objective point. We annoyed and harassed them, and made their march as tedious as possible. When we got to Buchanan we burned the bridge across James river, which did not delay them as much as we expected. They found a ford a mile above, and crossed by wading. Here we turned to the left and crossed the mountain by the Peaks of Otter, and camped that night at Fancy Farm, about eight miles north of Liberty. Next day we pursued our journey through Liberty, and on the high hill south of the town we gave the Yankees much trouble with our four six-pounders, with which we shelled them and made further progre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
speak to Lincoln. * * * After Stanton's retirement from the Buchanan Cabinet, when Lincoln was inaugurated, he maintained the closest confidential relations with Buchanan, and wrote him many letters expressing the utmost contempt for Lincoln. * * * These letters, given to the public in Curtis' Life of Buchanan, speak freely (see HBuchanan, speak freely (see Hapgood's Lincoln, page 254,) of the painful imbecility of Lincoln, the venality and corruption which ran riot in the government, and McClure goes on: It is an open secret that Stanton advised the revolutionary overthrow of the Lincoln government, to be replaced by General Mc-Clellan as military dictator. * * * These letters published by Curtis, bad as they are, are not the worst letters written by Stanton to Buchanan. Some of them were so violent in their expression against Lincoln * * * that they have been charitably withheld from the public. Whitney, in his On Circuit with Lincoln (page 424), tells of these suppressed letters. See, too, his pages 422
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
speak to Lincoln. * * * After Stanton's retirement from the Buchanan Cabinet, when Lincoln was inaugurated, he maintained the closest confidential relations with Buchanan, and wrote him many letters expressing the utmost contempt for Lincoln. * * * These letters, given to the public in Curtis' Life of Buchanan, speak freely (see HBuchanan, speak freely (see Hapgood's Lincoln, page 254,) of the painful imbecility of Lincoln, the venality and corruption which ran riot in the government, and McClure goes on: It is an open secret that Stanton advised the revolutionary overthrow of the Lincoln government, to be replaced by General Mc-Clellan as military dictator. * * * These letters published by Curtis, bad as they are, are not the worst letters written by Stanton to Buchanan. Some of them were so violent in their expression against Lincoln * * * that they have been charitably withheld from the public. Whitney, in his On Circuit with Lincoln (page 424), tells of these suppressed letters. See, too, his pages 422