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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 123 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 63 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 2 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ely advanced, and the column naturally followed. They carried the work immediately in front of them with heavy loss, marching by the flank, but found themselves confronted by another and stronger work on an eminence commanding the one they had taken. They held this position for some time, but farther progress being impossible, fell back somewhat, retaining about 100 yards of the ground they had gained. Colonel McIlvain, Sixty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was killed in this charge, Colonel Buckner, Seventy-ninth Illinois, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bullitt, Third Kentucky,wounded, and the names of many other brave officers and men close the list of casualties on this day. This day's operations demonstrated the enemy's position on the slope and crest of the ridge to be impregnable. General Harker and the officers and men of his brigade highly distinguished themselves for gallantry and good conduct. May 10, no change made except in the relative positions of the brigades, Wagner being
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 53 (search)
Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Ninth Illinois Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to respectfully submit the following report of the operations of my regiment during the campaign: On the 9th day of May my regiment was thrown forward on the skirmish line at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga. In the evening we were ordered, with other regiments, to assault fort at that point, which we did, but were driven back, losing in killed and wounded as follows: Col. Allen Buckner, severely wounded; 1 enlisted man killed, and 9 enlisted men wounded. Lieut. Col. H. E. Rives took command, and at dark we were relieved and retired to the rear. On the 14th of May we reached a point near Resaca, and were again ordered in line of battle, relieving a part of the Twenty-third Army Corps. My regiment here gained a point near the enemy's works, and were hotly engaged for a period of three hours, until we were relieved by the Second Brigade. We here lost 2 enlisted men
nois, Captain Edgar D. Swain. Fifty-first Illinois (1), Major Charles W. Davis. Fifty-first Illinois (2), Captain Albert M. Tilton. Seventy-ninth Illinois, Colonel Allen Buckner. Third Kentucky, Colonel Henry C Dunlap. Sixty-fourth Ohio, Colonel Alexander McIllvain. Sixty-fifth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel William A. Bullit. One Hundr Breckenridge's and Bates's adjutant-generals, and the battery that had made such stout resistance on the crest-two guns which were named Lady Breckenridge and Lady Buckner --General Bragg himself having barely time to escape before his headquarters were taken. My whole division had now reached the summit, and Wagner and Harkeposition. ...... Captain Parks reports his skirmish-line to have charged upon and captured one gun, that otherwise would have been hauled off. Report of Colonel Allen Buckner, Seventy-Ninth Illinois. The right of the regiment rested on the left of the road, where it crossed the rebel fortification, leading up the hill toward
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
eft wing, commanded by General Hardee, consisted of Buckner's and Anderson's divisions of infantry and Wheeler'nd talked with Generals Hardee, Polk, Cheatham, and Buckner; all were enthusiastic over our success, and our gonse. So anxious was Bragg for a fight that he sent Buckner's division to the front in the hope that an engagem to form the cavalry and the divisions of Cheatham, Buckner, and Patton Anderson at Perryville, and vigorously lle about 10 o'clock. General Liddell's brigade, of Buckner's division, had been advanced with his left near tht moved forward to the attack. Generals Hardee and Buckner, seeing Cheatham fairly in action, ordered General eing considerable space between Cheatham's left and Buckner's right, General John C. Brown's and Colonel Jones'nderson's division, and General S. A. M. Wood's, of Buckner's division, had been placed in position to fill theigades, of Anderson's division, were to the left of Buckner, and the line thus arranged with cavalry on both fl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
, Col. John Beatty; 10th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Joseph W. Burke; 1st Mich. Battery, Capt. Cyrus O. Loomis. Brigade loss: k, 193; w, 606; m, 23 = 822. Twenty-eighth Brigade, Col. John C. Starkweather: 24th Ill., Capt. August Mauff; 79th Pa., Col. Henry A. Hambright; 1st Wis., Lieut.-Col. George B. Bingham; 21st Wis., Col. Benjamin J. Sweet; 4th Ind. Battery, Capt. Asahel K. Bush; 1st Ky. Battery, Capt. David C. Stone. Brigade loss: k,170; w, 477; m, 109 =756. Unattached: 2d Ky. Cav. (6 co's), Col. Buckner Board; A, C, and H, 1st Mich., Eng'rs and Mech's, Maj. Enos Hopkins. Unattached loss: w, 18; m, 4 = 22. Tenth division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Jackson (k). Staff loss: k, 1. Thirty-third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William R. Terrill (k), Col. Albert S. Hall: 80th Ill., Col. Thomas G. Allen; 123d Ill., Col. James Monroe; Detachments 7th and 32d Ky. and 3d Tenn., Col. Theophilus T. Garrard; 105th Ohio, Col. Albert S. Hall; Parsons's (improvised) Battery, Lieut. Charles C. Parsons. Brigade los
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
T. Hotchkiss; 32d Ind., Lieut.-Col. Frank Erdelmeyer; 39th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Fielder A. Jones; 15th Ohio, Col. William Wallace, Capt. A. R. Z. Dawson, Col. William Wallace; 49th Ohio, Col. William H. Gibson, Lieut.-Col. Levi Drake (k), Capt. Samuel F. Gray. Brigade loss: k, 90; w, 373; 1m, 701 = 1164. Second (late Fifth) Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Edward N. Kirk (w), Col. Joseph B. Dodge: 34th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Hiram W. Bristol, Maj. Alexander P. Dysart; 79th Ill., Col. Sheridan P. Read (k), Maj. Allen Buckner; 29th Ind., Lieut.-Col. David M. Dunn (c), Maj. Joseph P. Collins; 30th Ind. Col. Joseph B. Dodge, Lieut.-Col. Orrin D. Hurd; 77th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Peter B. Housum (k), Capt. Thomas E. Rose. Brigade loss: k, 99; w, 384; m, 376 = 859. Third (late Fourth) Brigade, Col. Philemon P. Baldwin: 6th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Hagerman Tripp; 5th Ky., Lieut.-Col. William W. Berry (w); 1st Ohio, Maj. Joab A. Stafford; 93d Ohio, Col. Charles Anderson (w). Brigade loss: k, 59; w, 244; mn, 209 = 512. Artil
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's Ohio raid. (search)
Morgan's Ohio raid. In the summer of 1863, the Confederate army at Tullahoma having been weakened by detachments for the defense of Vicksburg, Bragg found himself exposed to the risk of an attack by Rosecrans from Murfreesboro' simultaneously with a movement by Burnside from the Ohio to drive Buckner out of Knoxville. Bragg therefore determined to fall back to Chattanooga. To cover the retreat he ordered Brigadier-General John H. Morgan with a picked force from his division of mounted infantry Brig.-Gen. B. W. Duke commanded the First Brigade, and Colonel Adam R. Johnson the Second.--editors. to ride into Kentucky, breaking up the railroad, attacking Rosecrans's detachments, and threatening Louisville. To gain more time, Morgan wanted to extend the raid by a wide sweep beyond the Ohio, but Bragg would not consent. Morgan set out from Burkesville, on the 2d of July, with 2460 men and 4 guns, ostensibly to execute Bragg's orders, but really bent on carrying out his own pla
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
Tennessee to the north of the town to cut off Buckner at Knoxville from a junction with Bragg, and were pressing toward Knoxville.--D. H. H. Buckner's division was promptly withdrawn south of thuted for Stewart's, sent to Knoxville to join Buckner. D. H. H. consisting of Breckinridge's and C his movements. He was further informed that Buckner's corps would be moved within supporting distng he called his four corps commanders, Polk, Buckner, W. H. T. Walker, and myself, together, and ts flank and rear in the same direction. 3. Buckner, crossing at Tedford's Ford, will join in the at Glass's Mill; Polk's at Lee and Gordon's; Buckner's at Byram's Ford; Hood's at Tedford's Ford. was falling back, A. P. Stewart's division of Buckner's corps, 3400 strong, attacked Palmer's divisave the left wing, consisting of the corps of Buckner and Hood, and the division of Hindman,--22,84were foes or friends, and soon recognized General Buckner. The cheers that went up when the two wi[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.91 (search)
eft in the Union line. McCook had already called up Wilder to strengthen his front, and sent for the main cavalry to protect the right. The right had unexpectedly become, as it were, the rear of the army. Unhappily for the National army, Bragg was not now massing his forces on our left. He had just been defeated and repulsed there. Bragg's main plan had failed; but in the quiet forest, within almost a stone's-throw of our right, and in the still overclouding mist, were Longstreet and Buckner, with the left wing of the Confederate army massed in battle array, impatiently awaiting the signal for attack. Longstreet's troops were placed in column of brigades at half distance,--a masterpiece of tactics. Hood, a soldier full of energy and dash, was to lead the column, his own division being massed five brigades deep, with the brigades of Kershaw and Humphreys as additional supports. The order to advance came at last. The deep Confederate lines suddenly appeared. The woods in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes on the Chickamauga campaign. (search)
nooga. Fortunately for our army, the Confederate general, while easily defending the pass nearest the town, gave no attention to the other two. Thomas was directed to the 26 and McCook to the42 mile pass, while Crittenden made demonstrations near Chattanooga. These admirable movements endangered Bragg's communications and forced him to choose between immediate retreat and ultimate surrender. He retreated; and on the 9th of September Crittenden entered Chattanooga. These operations drew Buckner from Knoxville to the aid of Bragg, and Burnside marched into Knoxville. It is surprising that the events of the last sixty days did not suggest to General Halleck concentrations that must have ended the war in 1863. By the 4th of July Meade had seriously defeated and permanently weakened Lee at Gettysburg, and Grant, by giving us Vicksburg and 30,000 prisoners, had ended all important operations near the Mississippi River. In the main, this left Grant's army of 75,000 men free to be s
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