Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for S. B. Buckner or search for S. B. Buckner in all documents.

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico (search)
leave to visit Popocatapetl [Popocatepetl], the highest volcano in America, and to take an escort. I went with the party, many of whom afterwards occupied conspicuous positions before the country. Of those who went south, and attained high rank, there was Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a corps at Spottsylvania; Captain [H. H.] Sibley, a major-general, and, after the war, for a number of years in the employ of the Khedive of Egypt; Captain George Crittenden, a rebel general; S. B. Buckner, who surrendered Fort Donelson; and Mansfield Lovell, who commanded at New Orleans before that city fell into the hands of the National troops. Of those who remained on our side there were Captain Andrew Porter, Lieutenant C. P. Stone and Lieutenant Z. B. Tower. There were quite a number of other officers, whose names I cannot recollect. At a little village (Ozumba) near the base of Popocatapetl, where we purposed to commence the ascent, we procured guides and two pack mules with f
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, General Halleck in command-commanding the district of Cairo-movement on Fort Henry- capture of Fort Henry (search)
as directed by General McClellan, through my department commander, to make a reconnaissance in favor of Brigadier-General Don Carlos Buell, who commanded the Department of the Ohio, with headquarters at Louisville, and who was confronting General S. B. Buckner with a larger Confederate force at Bowling Green. It was supposed that Buell was about to make some move against the enemy, and my demonstration was intended to prevent the sending of troops from Columbus, Fort Henry or Donelson to BucknBuckner. I at once ordered General Smith to send a force up the west bank of the Tennessee to threaten forts Heiman and Henry; McClernand at the same time with a force of 6,000 men was sent out into west Kentucky, threatening Columbus with one column and the Tennessee River with another. I went with McClernand's command. The weather was very bad; snow and rain fell; the roads, never good in that section, were intolerable. We were out more than a week splashing through the mud, snow and rain, the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Investment of Fort Donelson-the naval operations-attack of the enemy-assaulting the works-surrender of the Fort (search)
would be impossible to hold out longer. General Buckner, who was third in rank in the garrison busured that Johnston was already in Nashville, Buckner too agreed that surrender was the proper thinllow, who declined it. It then developed upon Buckner, who accepted the responsibility of the posith brought to me the following letter from General Buckner: Headquarters, Fort Donelson, February 1 Camp near Donelson, February 16, 1862 General S. B. Buckner, Confederate Army. Sir: Yours of thpropose. I am, sir, Your very ob't se'v‘t, S. B. Buckner, Brig. Gen. C. S. A. General Buckner, General Buckner, as soon as he had dispatched the first of the above letters, sent word to his different commanders er the fort. As soon as the last letter from Buckner was received I mounted my horse and rode to D I had been at West Point three years with Buckner and afterwards served with him in the army, shat division, and were buried or cared for by Buckner after the surrender and when Pillow was a fug[4 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
Knoxville; of Willcox being threatened by a force from the east — a letter was received from Bragg which contained these words: As there may still be some non-combatants in Chattanooga, I deem it proper to notify you that prudence would dictate their early withdrawal. Of course, I understood that this was a device intended to deceive; but I did not know what the intended deception was. On the 22d, however, a deserter came in who informed me that Bragg was leaving our front, and on that day Buckner's division was sent to reinforce Longstreet at Knoxville, and another division [Patrick Cleburne's] started to follow but was recalled. The object of Bragg's letter, no doubt, was in some way to detain me until Knoxville could be captured, and his troops there be returned to Chattanooga. During the night of the 21st the rest of the pontoon boats, completed, one hundred and sixteen in all, were carried up to and placed in North Chickamauga. The material for the roadway over these was d
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
h Bridgeport, thus securing full rations and supplies of every kind; and also when he knew reinforcements were coming to me. Knoxville was of no earthly use to him while Chattanooga was in our hands. If he should capture Chattanooga, Knoxville with its garrison would have fallen into his hands without a struggle. I have never been able to see the wisdom of this move. Then, too, after Sherman had arrived, and when Bragg knew that he was on the north side of the Tennessee River, he sent Buckner's division to reinforce Longstreet. He also started another division a day later, but our attack having commenced before it reached Knoxville Bragg ordered it back. It had got so far, however, that it could not return to Chattanooga in time to be of service there. It is possible this latter blunder may have been made by Bragg having become confused as to what was going on on our side. Sherman had, as already stated, crossed to the north side of the Tennessee River at Brown's Ferry, in