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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 177 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 96 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 73 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 42 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 29 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Simon B. Buckner or search for Simon B. Buckner in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
lt to comprehend. That terrible crisis in the life of the nation was promptly met, and the salvation of the Republic was assured. In the mean time, the Confederates, flushed with victory, and satisfied that their so-called attorney-general (Benjamin) had predicted wisely, that pacification through recognition by France or England, or both, would occur in ninety days, and their independence be secured, were wasting golden moments in celebrating their own valor. It is reported that General Buckner, captured at Fort Donelson several months afterward, while on his way to Fort Warren, at Boston, as a prisoner of war, said to a gentleman in Albany: The effect of that battle was to inspire the Southerners with a blind confidence, and lull them into false security. The effect upon the Northerners, on the other hand, was to arouse, madden, and exasperate. Yet, in the manner of that unthriftiness of time and opportunity, there was a potential force that gave amazing strength to the Co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
neutrality conference between McClellan and Buckner Magoffin encourages the secessionists, 72. reckenridge among the traitors operations of Buckner General Anderson's counter — action, 77. sech its politicians had placed it. He had sent Buckner to confer with General McClellan (then June ly denied ever making any such agreement with Buckner. Letter to Captain Wilson, of the United S and Hickman, speedily followed that act. Simon B. Buckner, the corrupter of the patriotism of largelle to forward re-enforcements. Fortunately, Buckner had been delayed, near Bowling Green, by the ain was thrown from the track. But for this, Buckner might have reached Louisville before Anderson against an invading foe. and in supporting Buckner in his treasonable operations in his native Sng Green, in the heart of Kentucky, under General Buckner, and who at that time were too weak to maNot a platoon of soldiers had gone. out from Buckner's camp in that direction. That retrograde mo[2 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ng the region which the Nationals abandoned. See page 84. We left Southern Kentucky, from the mountains to the Mississippi River, in possession of the Confederates. Polk was holding the western portion, with his Headquarters at Columbus; General Buckner, with a strongly intrenched camp at Bowling Green, was holding the center; and Generals Zollicoffer and Marshall and others were keeping watch and ward on its mountain flanks. Back of these, and between them and the region where the rebellical events in Kentucky were in progress, military movements in that quarter.were assuming very important features. General Johnston concentrated troops at Bowling Green, and General Hardee was called from Southeastern Missouri, to supersede General Buckner in command there. The forces under General Polk at Columbus were strengthened, and Zollicoffer, having secured the important position of Cumberland Gap, proceeded to occupy the rich mineral and agricultural districts around the upper waters
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
valley, which separated the right wing under Buckner from the right center commanded by Colonel Hind by a succeeding movement on the center, by Buckner, cast the whole beleaguering army into confusthat reached to the river, just above Dover. Buckner was directed to strike Wallace's division, wh roll the enemy in full retreat over upon General Buckner, when, by his attack in flank and rear, their works in confusion. They withdrew, said Buckner, without panic, but in some confusion, to thenor the command; will die first. --Then, said Buckner, coolly, I suppose, gentlemen, the surrender f you move before I shall offer to surrender, Buckner replied. Then, sir, said Floyd, I surrender e sent to Camp Douglas, near Chicago ; Generals Buckner and Tilghman, who were captured at Fort Honists of Kentucky asked for the surrender of Buckner to the civil authorities of that State, to bebordinate officers; and of Floyd, Pillow, and Buckner, and their subordinates. Also written and or[11 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
and Louisville. Breckenridge had been left in Tennessee with a large force of all arms, to retard Buell and invest Nashville, then garrisoned by the divisions of Thomas, Negley, and Palmer, under the command of General Thomas. Bragg's advance under General J. R. Chalmers, about eight thousand strong, with seven guns, pushed on toward Louisville, and on the 14th, Sept. 1862. two brigades Composed of Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama troops. of the division of the Kentucky traitor, S. B. Buckner, under General Duncan, of Mississippi, encountered a little more than two thousand National troops, under Colonel T. J. Wilder, These consisted of about 200 recruits of the Seventeenth Indiana, and Sixty-seventh and Eighty-ninth of the same State, and one company each of the Eighteenth Regulars, of cavalry, and of the Louisville Provost Guards. Their guns consisted of three 12-pounders and a 8-inch rifled cannon, under Lieutenant Mason. The Thirteenth Indiana and Thirty-third Kentuc