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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 177 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 96 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 87 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 73 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 42 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 29 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Simon B. Buckner or search for Simon B. Buckner in all documents.

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o the United States and to Kentucky. That State Guard, organized by Gen. Simon B. Buckner, under the auspices of Gov. Magoffin, became a mere recruiting and drilipened for their intended service. Ultimately, having corrupted all he could, Buckner followed them into the camp of open treason, The Louisville Journal of Sept. 27th denounced the treachery of Buckner in the following terms: Away with your pledges and assurances — with your protestations, apologies, and proclamations, r needs or their dignity. The climax was reached when June 10th, 1861. Gen. Buckner proclaimed that he had entered into a compact with Gen. McClellan, commandinany such treaty — or, in fact, any treaty at all. He had had an interview with Buckner, at the request of the latter, who had promised to drive out any Confederate force that should invade Kentucky--that was all. No doubt remained that Buckner had drawn largely on his imagination; proclaiming, as agreed on, much that he had scar
ghest duty. A favored officer in our regular army transmitted his resignation, to be tendered in case his State seceded, and was not cashiered therefor, as he should have been promptly and finally. All over the South, men said, This Secession is madness — it will ruin all concerned — I have resisted it to the best of my ability — but my State has seceded nevertheless, and I must go with my State. But, on the other hand, Sterling Price, Humphrey Marshall, James B. Clay, Richard Hawes, Simon B. Buckner, William Preston, Charles S. Morehead, and scores like them — in good part old Whigs, who could not help knowing better — never seemed to imagine that the refusal of their respective States to secede laid them under the smallest obligation to restrain their traitorous propensities. State Sovereignty was potent only to authorize and excuse treason to the Union--never to restrain or prevent it. XIII. The Southern leaders entered upon their great struggle with the Union under the
ature, Governor, and most of his associate State officers, were the Democratic compatriots of Breckinridge, Burnett, and Buckner. Only a single district elected a Secessionist, by four-sevenths of its total vote; and he its old member, who had hithis majority was very nearly maintained at her regular State election (August 5th), when — Magoffin being still Governor, Buckner commander of the State Guard, and the local offices mainly held by State-Rights Democrats, with the recent Union rout anssenger, it is true, in conversation, said that he had heard in Nashville that Secretary Walker had sent a dispatch to Gen. Buckner, giving Gen. Polk a discretion to hold to or withdraw from the occupation of the post in Kentucky. Gen. Grant did ed upon by false representations of the number of our forces at Bowling Green. * * * About the middle of September, Gen. Buckner advanced, with a small force of about 4,000 men, which was increased, by the 15th of October, to 12,000; and, though o
28; vote cast for him in Kentucky, 492; letter to Jeff. Davis, 511. Buckingham, Gov., of Conn., is reflected, 326. Buckner, Aylett, of Ky., 194. Buckner, Gen. Simon B., organizes State Guard; Louisville Journal curses him, 494; 496; 509; 60Buckner, Gen. Simon B., organizes State Guard; Louisville Journal curses him, 494; 496; 509; 609. Buffalo, N. Y., the Free-Soil Convention at, 191; its Platform, 192. Buford, Col., of Ala., his arrival in Kansas, 243; besieges Lawrence, 243. Bull Run, battle of, 539 to 547; our army moves on Centerville, 539; map of the field, 540; oMagoffin's message, 492-3; Legislature remains loyal; Union meeting in Louisville, 493-4; the nature of the State Guard; Buckner; Legislature reassembles; speech of Rousseau, 494-5; neutrality sentiments of the Legislature; election for the Peace Call to arms, 460; on the mockery of the vote in Virginia, 479; on the reign of terror in Tennessee. 483; denunciation of Buckner, 494; citation from, 617. Lovejoy, Elijah P., sketch of his life, martyrdom, and death, 130 to 142. Lovejoy, Owen,