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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for William Budd or search for William Budd in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
h chance of success against the enemy unless he is well supported by his officers; and as Dupont up to this time had been everywhere successful, we must give a portion of the credit to those who served under his command. That Dupont was fortunate in his selection, the names of Captain C. H. Davis, Commanders John Rodgers, Drayton, C. R. P. Rodgers, Godon, Parrott, Steedman, Gillis, Prentiss, Lieutenants-Commanding Balch, Stevens, Ammen, Nicholson, Truxton, Rhind, Bankhead, Conroy,Watmough, Budd, Semmes and Phoenix, in command of vessels,will show, besides the junior officers mentioned favorably by their commanding officers. Nearly all the commanding officers reached high rank, and the youngest of them are now well up on the list of commodores and captains. Eleven of them attained the rank of rear-admiral; and of these six are still living, have retired from active duty, and are reaping the reward of faithful service. They will figure again in the course of this narrative, a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
d Navy. The first day of the year was selected for the attack. Commander C. R. P. Rodgers was appointed to the command of the naval forces, consisting of the Ottawa, Lieut.-Commanding Stevens, Pembina, Lieut.-Commanding Bankhead, and four armed boats from the Wabash, carrying howitzers, under charge of Lieutenants Upshur, Luce and Irwin, and Acting Master Kempff, all of which were to enter the Coosaw by Beaufort river; the gun-boat Seneca, Lieut.-Com. Ammen, and the tug-boat Ellen, Acting-Master Budd, to participate, both of which were to move up Beaufort River and approach the batteries at Seabrook and Port Royal Ferry, by Whale Branch. The armed Tug Hale, Acting-Master Foster, was also ordered to report to the commander of the expedition. The gun-boats reached Beaufort on the 31st December, 1862, and in order not to give the enemy notice of their approach, they remained there until after dark, when they ascended the river to within two miles of the Coosaw. At 4 o'clock the n
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
Acting-Ensigns, J. M. Holmes and J. R. Dickinson; Acting-Master's Mates, T. E. Quayle and T. M. Nelson; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Moses Petersen; Acting-Third-Assistants, R. H. Ryan and G. B. McDermott. Bark Gem-of-the-sea. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. B. Baxter; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, B. G. Walton; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. A. Strong; Acting-Masters, P. F. Coffin and H. B. Carter; Acting-Ensign, Samuel Bliss. Steamer Potomska. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, William Budd; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. C. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. H. Swan; Acting-Masters, R. P. Walter, B. W. Leary and Abner West; Acting-Master's Mates, J. D. Wells and Woodward Carter; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, G. H. Guyer; Acting-Third-Assistants, C. A. Martine, Edwin Vaughan and W. L. McKay. Steamer Memphis. Acting-Lieutenant, P. G. Watmough; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. H. Brown; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. E. Foster; Acting-Master, C. A. Curtis; Acting-Ensi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
g of such an attempt, when the Webb appeared above New Orleans on April 24th, 1865, running at full speed, and passed down the river. She was flying the United States flag, and had a torpedo on a pole projecting from the bow. Every one who saw the Webb took her for an army transport, but, being finally recognized by some one, she received two shot in her hull, which, however, did no damage. The Hollyhock, Lieutenant-Commanander Bancroft Gherardi; the Florida, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant-Commander Wm. Budd; the Quaker City, Commander Wm. F. Spicer, and the Ossipee, Commander Wm. E. LeRoy, got underway as soon as they could get up steam and went in pursuit of the Webb, the Hollyhock far in the lead. When the Webb was about twenty-five miles below New Orleans, she encountered the Richmond, Captain Theodore P. Green, coming up the river. The chances for her escape being thus cut off, the Webb was headed for the left bank of the river and run ashore, and was set on fire by her comman