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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 171 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 163 47 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 97 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 97 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 40 6 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 37 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 33 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 32 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 29 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Buell or search for Buell in all documents.

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Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, II. (search)
ences. History never begins until reminiscence is ended. Even Mr. Ropes, in his championing of Buell the soldier, omits Buell the man. Now Buell, sulking over his wrongs, declined, when invited, toBuell the man. Now Buell, sulking over his wrongs, declined, when invited, to come back and take a command again. He found his dignity more important to him than the Union. Grant, meeting singular injustice after winning Donelson, has such words as these to say : If my courBuell, sulking over his wrongs, declined, when invited, to come back and take a command again. He found his dignity more important to him than the Union. Grant, meeting singular injustice after winning Donelson, has such words as these to say : If my course is not satisfactory, remove me at once. I do not wish to impede in any way the success of our arms. Good authority rates Buell a more military soldier than Grant, and very likely he was. But BueBuell a more military soldier than Grant, and very likely he was. But Buell thought of himself and forgot his country, while Grant thought of his country and forgot himself. Out of this very contrast a bright light falls, and we begin to see Grant. Writing intemperatelyBuell thought of himself and forgot his country, while Grant thought of his country and forgot himself. Out of this very contrast a bright light falls, and we begin to see Grant. Writing intemperately, his friends explain him as a sort of Napoleon ; his enemies, as a dull blunderer, accidentally reaping the glory which other people sowed. These extremes meet in error. We have not produced a Nap
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, V. (search)
o interrupted communications) or Grant's reason for going to Nashville (which was to confer with Buell, who had occupied that town), petulantly complained to Washington. It was set right in nine dayey Johnston surprised him. On Sunday and Monday, April 6 and 7, was fought the battle of Shiloh, Buell arriving in time to re-enforce Grant for Monday's fight. The words of Buell are the words of anBuell are the words of an imbittered rival; but they tell the unanswerable truth. An army comprising seventy regiments of infantry, twenty battalions of artillery, and a sufficiency of cavalry, lay for two weeks and more Re-enforced by Desaix's return in the afternoon, he recovered himself, as Grant, re-enforced by Buell, recovered himself on the second day. The Union lost some thirteen thousand men, the South eleve which now slid away like sand through his inanely opened fingers. He sat cautiously down; sent Buell to repair a railroad, which was promptly torn up; sent away troops to hold unprofitable points;