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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 208 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 177 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 175 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 125 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 108 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 82 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 10 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 69 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Don Carlos Buell or search for Don Carlos Buell in all documents.

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as I look back, though the mortification I then endured was deep and trying, I am convinced that it was hardly as much as I deserved for such an outrageous breach of discipline. There was no question as to Terrill's irritating tone, but in giving me the order he was prompted by the duty of his position as a file closer, and I was not the one to remedy the wrong which I conceived had been done me, and clearly not justifiable in assuming to correct him with my own hands. In 1862, when General Buell's army was assembling at Louisville, Terrill was with it as a brigadier-general (for, although a Virginian, he had remained loyal), and I then took the initiative toward a renewal of our acquaintance. Our renewed friendship was not destined to be of long duration, I am sorry to say, for a few days later, in the battle of Perryville, while gallantly fighting for his country, poor Terrill was killed. My suspension necessitated my leaving the Academy, and I returned home in the fall of
mistake made by dispersing Halleck's forces after the fall of Corinth, General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio had been started some time before on its march easte part of the enemy, now (at Tupelo under General Braxton Bragg, either to meet Buell or frustrate his designs by some counteroperation, I was expected to furnish, bsfer from Mississippi of most of Bragg's army, for the purpose of counteracting Buell's operations in northern Alabama and East Tennessee. This decisive evidence waervice he had rendered. In moving from Corinth east toward Chattanooga, General Buell's army was much delayed by the requirement that he should repair the Memphile and Cincinnati — was now well defined, and had already rendered abortive General Buell's designs on Chattanooga and East Tennessee. Therefore extraordinary effornd of such other regiments as might be sent me in advance of the arrival of General Buell's army. When I reached Louisville I reported to Major-General William N
s was assigned to the command of a division in Buell's army after that officer had been relieved fr strike Louisville and capture the city before Buell could arrive on the ground. It became necessahe race that was then going on between him and Buell on parallel roads, the Army of the Ohio outmarstaff, Colonel Fry, and, while not questioning Buell's good intentions nor his pure motives, insiste was among the officers much criticism of General Buell's management of the recent campaign, whicht was asserted, and by many conceded, that General Buell had a sufficient force to risk a fight. Hto the north toward Bardstown, he left open to Buell the direct road to Louisville by way of Elizab orders were now issued for a concentration of Buell's army at Bowling Green, with a view to marchithe hardships of war. At Bowling Green General Buell was relieved, General W. S. Rosecrans succany who still had the utmost confidence in General Buell, and they repelled with some asperity the [15 more...]
General Rosecrans assumed command of the department October 30, at Louisville, and joined the Army November 2. There had been much pressure brought to bear on General Buell to induce him to take measures looking to the occupancy of East Tennessee, and the clamor to this end from Washington still continued; but now that Bragg was so lay down his life within a few days, and on the same fatal field. His brigade had been performing garrison duty in Nashville during the siege of that city while Buell's army was in Kentucky, but disliking the prospect of inactivity pending the operations opening before us, Roberts had requested and obtained a transfer to the armrank by Brigadier-General Jeff. C. Davis; BrigadierGeneral R. W. Johnson, and Brigadier-General P. H. Sheridan. Although the corps nomenclature established by General Buell was dropped, the grand divisions into which he had organized the army at Louisville were maintained, and, in fact, the conditions established then remained pra