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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
ol. J. M. Wells; 26th Miss., Col. A. E. Reynolds, Maj. T. F. Parker; Miss. Battery, Capt. J. J. Cowan; Miss. Battery, Capt. Jacob Culbertson. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, k, 5; w, 10; m, 42 = 57. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston: 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Mellon; 22d Miss., Lieut.-Col. H. J. Reid; 31st Miss., Col. J. A. Orr; 33d Miss., Col. D. W. Hurst; 1st Miss. Battalion Sharpshooters, Maj. W. A. Rayburn. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, w, 2; m, 1=3. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abram Buford: 27th Ala., Col. James Jackson; 35th Ala., Col. Edward Goodwin; 54th Ala., Col. Alpheus Baker (w); 55th Ala., Col. John Snodgrass; 9th Ark., Col. Isaac L. Dunlop; 3d Ky. (4 co's), Maj. J. H. Bowman; 7th Ky., Col. Edward Crossland; 12th La., Col. T. M. Scott; Pointe Coupee (La.) Artillery, Capt. Alcide Bouanchaud. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, k, 11; w, 49 = 60. Stevenson's division, Maj.-Gen. Carter L. Stevenson. Staff loss: Champion's Hill, k, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
rogress was at times comparatively slow. But, withal, the enemy was closely pressed and every opportunity was seized upon to bring him to bay. In the vicinity of Lynnville, the country being somewhat more open, he was driven back rapidly, and at Buford's station, while General Hatch was engaging him upon the turnpike, General Croxton struck him in the flank, captured one flag and a number of prisoners, wounded General Abram Buford, and drove his cavalry rapidly beyond Richland Creek. Just beGeneral Abram Buford, and drove his cavalry rapidly beyond Richland Creek. Just before sundown on Christmas day Forrest, in a fit of desperation, made a stand on a heavily wooded ridge at the head of a ravine, and by a rapid and savage counter-thrust drove back the skirmishers of Thomas Harrison's brigade, capturing one gun, which he succeeded in carrying away, as the sole trophy of that desperate campaign. This was the last flicker of aggressive temper shown by any part of Hood's beaten and demoralized army. Hammond, Hatch, and Croxton hastened to the front, and falling up
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
gard: La. Battery (Slocomb's); S. C. Battery (Ferguson's); Tenn. Battery (Mebane's). cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. James R. Chalmers. Escort, Capt. C. T. Smith. Rucker's Brigade, Col. E. W. Rucker, Lieut.-Col. R. R. White: 7th Ala.,----; 5th Miss.,----; 7th Tenn.,----; 14th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. R. White; 15th Tenn.,----; 26th Tenn. Battalion,----. Biffle's Brigade, Col. J. B. Biffle: 9th Tenn.,----; 10th Tenn.,----. At the time of the battle of Nashville, Forrest, with Jackson's and Buford's divisions of cavalry and Mercer's and Palmer's brigades of infantry, was detached from the main army and operating on its flanks. Hood reported that he began the campaign with an effective total of 40,403. On November 6th his strength was 44,729. By the arrival of Forrest's cavalry, on November 15th, the army aggregated 53,938. Exclusive of Palmer's brigade of Lee's corps, Mercer's brigade of Cheatham's corps, and Sears's and Cockrell's brigades of Stewart's corps, and Forrest's cavalr
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ed for the special service in which I propose to employ him—partisan war on the enemy's lines in Kentucky. He has raised his command, and nearly armed and equipped it from the enemy's stores. Later a brigade of cavalry was organized under Gen. Abram Buford, of Kentucky, which operated about Murfreesboro until after the battle, when General Buford was transferred to the Mississippi department. General Buckner did not continue long in Tennessee, but was assigned to the command of Mobile, where General Buford was transferred to the Mississippi department. General Buckner did not continue long in Tennessee, but was assigned to the command of Mobile, where he remained until the following spring, when he relieved Gen. Kirby Smith as commander of the department of East Tennessee, the latter being transferred to the Trans-Mississippi. The army spent the month of December, 1862, before Murfreesboro, drilling and perfecting itself in organization in contemplation of an early attack by Rosecrans, who was collecting a formidable army at Nashville. General Wheeler's cavalry was in front, while Forrest covered the left flank in front of Columbia, where
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
at that place. His division was now composed of Adams', Evans', Stovall's and Helm's brigades, the Forty-seventh Georgia, and Waters' South Carolina battery, reporting 8.194 for duty. There were also in Johnston's army the majority of the Kentucky troops, the Third, Seventh and Eighth regiments, with many Kentucky officers assigned to important duties. Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, a most gallant officer, had been killed in the Baker's Creek battle, near Edwards' Depot, a short time before; Gen. Abram Buford and Gen. Geo. B. Cosby were in command of cavalry brigades, and Dr. D. W. Yandell had become medical director on General Johnston's staff. The campaign which followed was one of great hardship and of small results; the weary marches, the unhealthful climate and bad drinking water being especially severe on the Kentuckians. Vicksburg fell on the 4th of July, and with the battle of Gettysburg just preceding, marked a fatal turning point in the fortunes of the Confederacy. The only e
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
credited to other States, but most of whom went directly from Kentucky. The following is the list with their rank: General Albert Sidney Johnston (Texas.) Lieutenant-General Simon Bolivar Buckner. Lieutenant-General John B. Hood (Texas). Lieutenant-General Richard Taylor (Louisiana). Major-Generals John C. Breckinridge, George B. Crittenden, William Preston, Gustavus W. Smith. Brigadier-Generals John. H. Morgan, Daniel W. Adams (Louisiana), Roger W. Hanson, Basil W. Duke, Abram Buford, Geo. B. Cosby, John S. Williams, James M. Hawes, Ben Hardin Helm, George B. Hodge, Claiborne F. Jackson (Missouri), Joseph H. Lewis, Samuel B. Maxey (Texas), H. B. Lyon, Randall L. Gibson (Louisiana), Thomas H. Taylor. The number of the rank and file in the Confederate army can only be estimated, but the total number of officers and men of all arms is computed by those most competent to judge at 25,000, and represents strictly a volunteer force free from the call of any State or natio
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
death occurred May 17, 1875, at Lexington. Brigadier-General Abram Buford Brigadier-General Abram Buford was born in Brigadier-General Abram Buford was born in Kentucky in 1820. He entered the United States military academy in 1837, and at graduation in 1841 was promoted in the army war between the North and South could not be averted, Captain Buford without hesitation cast his lot with the South. Durin2, a cavalry brigade was organized in the State, of which Buford was put in command with a commission as brigadier-general,he latter's force at Murfreesboro. In the latter campaign Buford's brigade was composed of the regiments of Colonels Smith,. H. Bowman. The Eighth Kentucky, mounted, was detached. Buford's command took a prominent part at Baker's Creek, and he we Tennessee brigade of Col. T. H. Bell. With this command Buford took part in Forrest's spring campaign in West Tennes see,k that Forrest declared his obligations principally due to Buford. During the Atlanta campaign he took part in the operatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
ed to his fate and prepared to die. He had been religiously educated from early youth. Thus lived and thus died Major Joseph Washington Anderson, a gallant Virginian, perishing far from home, on a stricken field, for his belief, his flag, his honor and his country. In the December of that year his body was taken from the battleground by his father. He lies among his kindred in the graveyard at Fincastle, in the old county of Botetourt. About four in the afternoon of that disastrous day Buford's Brigade of Loring's Division arrived to the support of General Stevenson, but too late for effective service. The battle was lost. In the late afternoon the Confederates withdrew in good order, crossed Baker's Creek at sunset and bivouacked near Bovina. The next day saw the march back to Vicksburg. Another day and the siege of Vicksburg had begun. The Confederate line of defense was five miles in length. Barton occupied the river front and the fortifications on the right centre; Cu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
20, 1862, the Confederate War Department issued an order assigning Chenault's Regiment to General Abram Buford's Cavalry Brigade, which was to be dismounted. This was done by instigation of General Bt this being done. Notwithstanding the fact that Chenault's Regiment was officially assigned to Buford's Brigade as early as November 20, 1862 (at which time its designation was changed from 7th Kent had sufficient influence to keep the regiment under his own command, and it never was a part of Buford's Brigade, only nominally. Soon after joining Morgan, the Eleventh was prominently engaged inent, though operating (as it always did) under Morgan's commands, was still officially a part of Buford's Brigade. About January 20, `1863, Colonel Chenault got leave to go to Richmond, Va., where he0, 1863, were issued, which rescinded the order of November 20, 1862, assigning his regiment to Buford's Brigade. The order concluded with these words: This regiment will remain, as heretofore, with