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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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The female Lieutenant.--The public will remember the numerous paragraphs published concerning one Lieutenant Harry Buford, nee Mrs. Williams, with a history romantic in war as that of Joan of Arc. Last summer the Lieutenant got into Castle Thunder, her sex not corresponding with the dashing uniform she wore. She was released, and went from Richmond to Chattanooga, where she joined General Bragg's army, got upon the staff of General A. P. Stewart, and for a time was employed in the secret service, effecting important arrests of spies, and doing some very daring things. The other day she visited Richmond again, not as the gay Lieutenant, but in the garments more becoming her sex, and bearing the name of Mrs. Jeruth De Caulp, she having, in the interval, married an officer of the confederate States provisional army of that name, first obtaining a divorce from her first husband, Williams, who is in the army of General Grant. In consideration of her services, the confederate go
Anecdotes of General Buford.--Major-General Buford, than whom probably no commander was so devotedly loved by those around him, was offered a major-general's commission in the rebel army when in Utah. He crushed the communication in his hand, and Major-General Buford, than whom probably no commander was so devotedly loved by those around him, was offered a major-general's commission in the rebel army when in Utah. He crushed the communication in his hand, and declared that he would live and die under the flag of the Union. A few hours before his death, and while suffering from delirium, he roundly scolded his negro servant; but recovering himself temporarily, he called the negro to his bedside and said tg. You have been a faithful servant, Edward. The poor negro sat down and wept as though his heart was broken. When General Buford received his commission as Major-General, he exclaimed: Now, I wish that I could live. His last intelligible words, ll the roads, and don't let the men run back to the rear. This was an illustration of the ruling passion strong in death, for no trait in General Buford's character was more conspicuous than his dislike to see men skulking or hanging on the rear.