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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brandy Station, skirmish near. (search)
ile Meade, with the Army of the Potomac, was halting on the north side of the Rappahannock River, in the summer of 1863, is cavalry were not idle. On Aug. 1, General Buford, with his troopers, dashed across that river, struck Stuart's cavalry, and pushed them back almost to Culpeper Court-House. So vigorous and sudden was the as Brandy Station, where they were about to dine. They left their dinner untouched and immediately decamped, leaving the viands to be eaten by the Union officers. Buford pursued, and from Auburn (the residence of the stanch Virginia Unionist, John Minor Botts) there was a running fight back towards Brandy Station; for, strongly co to be eaten by the Union officers. Buford pursued, and from Auburn (the residence of the stanch Virginia Unionist, John Minor Botts) there was a running fight back towards Brandy Station; for, strongly confronted there by Stuart. Buford became a fugitive in turn. In that engagement he lost 140 men, of whom sixteen were killed.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, John, 1825- (search)
861. He commanded a brigade of cavalry under General Hooker, and was so severely wounded near the Rappahannock (August, 1862) that he was reported dead. In the battle of Antietam he was on General McClellan's staff. He was conspicuous in many engagements while in command of the reserve cavalry brigade, and he began the battle of Gettysburg (q. v.). He was chief of Burnside's cavalry, and was assigned to the command of the Army of the Cumberland just before his death in Washington, D. C., Dec. 16, 1863.--His half-brother, Napoleon Bonaparte Buford (born in Woodford county, Ky., Jan. 13, 1807), was also graduated at West Point, and entered the artillery. He was a pupil in the Law School of Harvard University; Professor of Natural Philosophy at West Point; but retired to civil pursuits in 1835. Engaging first as colonel in the Union army in 1861, he served well during the continuance of the strife, and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. He died March 28, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Napoleon Bonaparte, 1807- (search)
Buford, Napoleon Bonaparte, 1807- Military officer; born in Woodford county, Ky., Jan. 13, 1807; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1827; and served for several years on surveying duty; subsequently resigning and entering civil life. When the Civil War broke out he was commissioned colonel of the 27th Illinois Volunteers; served through the war; was brevetted major-general of volunteers March 13, 1865. He died March 28, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
w Windsor, leaving General French, with 11,000 men, to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and convoy the public property from Harper's Ferry to Washington. Buford's cavalry was then at this place, and Kilpatrick's at Hanover, where he encountered and defeated the rear of Stuart's cavalry, who was roving the country in searc, would soon burst on some part of the devoted vicinity of Gettysburg. June 30 was a day of important preparations. At half-past 11 o'clock in the morning General Buford passed through Gettysburg upon a reconnoissance in force, with his cavalry, upon the Chambersburg road. The information obtained by him was immediately commu, will abundantly supply the deficiency of my necessarily too condensed statement. General Reynolds, on arriving at Gettysburg in the morning of the 1st, found Buford with his cavalry warmly engaged with the enemy, whom he held most gallantly in check. Hastening himself to the front, General Reynolds directed his men to be mov
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
rd, and struck the railway between Tullahoma and Decherd. He was confronted and menaced by National forces under Rousseau, Steedman, and Morgan, and withdrew before he had done much damage. At Fayetteville he divided his forces, giving 4,000 to Buford, his second in command. Buford attacked Athens (Oct. 2-3), which General Granger had regarrisoned with the 73d Indiana Regiment, and was repulsed. Forrest had pushed on to Columbia, on the Duck River, with 3,000 men, but did not attack, for he Buford attacked Athens (Oct. 2-3), which General Granger had regarrisoned with the 73d Indiana Regiment, and was repulsed. Forrest had pushed on to Columbia, on the Duck River, with 3,000 men, but did not attack, for he met Rousseau, with 4,000 men, coming down from Nashville. At the same time, Gen. C. C. Washburne was moving up the Tennessee on steamers, with 4,000 troops, 3,000 of them cavalry, to assist in capturing the invaders. Several other leaders of the National troops, under the command of General Thomas, who had then arrived at Nashville, joined in the hunt for Forrest. He saw his peril, Map of scene of some of Forrest's operations. and, paroling his prisoners (1,000), he destroyed 5 miles of t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gettysburg, battle of. (search)
ed Lee's evident intention to give battle at once. On the day before, Kilpatrick and Custer's cavalry had defeated some of Stuart's a few miles from Gettysburg. Buford's cavalry entered Gettysburg; and on the 30th the left wing of Meade's army, led by General Reynolds, arrived near there. At the same time the corps of Hill and Longstreet were approaching from Chambersburg, and Ewell was marching down from Carlisle in full force. On the morning of July 1 Buford, with 6,000 cavalry, met the van of Lee's army, led by General Heth, between Seminary Ridge (a little way from Gettysburg) and a parallel ridge a little farther west, when a sharp skirmish ensuedn corps, followed by Howard's, having those of Sickles and Slocum within call. The sound of fire-arms quickened his pace, and he marched rapidly to the relief of Buford, who was holding the Confederates in check. While Reynolds was placing some of his troops on the Chambersburg road, the Confederates made an attack, when a volle
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Groveton, battle of. (search)
low Jackson closely at one o'clock in the morning (Aug. 29), and Porter (whom he believed to be at the Junction) to move upon Centreville at dawn. Before these movements could be executed, Longstreet and Jackson had formed a partial junction. Near the entrance to Thoroughfare Gap, through which Longstreet had marched, there was Soldiers' monument at Groveton. a sharp engagement, which ended at twilight. Longstreet was held in check for a while by Ricketts's division, and the cavalry of Buford and Bayard, which had fought the battle. Early the next morning (Aug. 29), Ricketts fled to Gainesville, closely pursued. Pope's army was now scattered and somewhat confused. Lee's whole army, now combined, pressed forward. Pope ordered Sigel, supported by Reynolds, to advance from Groveton and attack Jackson on wooded heights near. He ordered Heintzelman, with the divisions of Hooker and Kearny, towards Gainesville, to be followed by Reno, while Porter, with his own corps and King's di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hanover, battle at. (search)
Hanover, battle at. General Meade's cavalry, during Lee's invasion of Maryland, before the battle of Gettysburg (q. v.), was continually hovering on the flanks of the Confederate army. The most dashing of the cavalry officers of that time were Colonels Kilpatrick and Custer. At about the same hour when Buford's division occupied Gettysburg, June 29, 1863. Kilpatrick, passing through Hanover, a few miles from Gettysburg, was suddenly surprised by Stuart's cavalry, then on their march for Carlisle. Stuart led in person, and made a desperate charge on the flank and rear of Farnsworth's brigade, at the eastern end of the village. A severe battle ensued in the town and on its borders, when Custer joined in the fight with his troops, and the Confederates were repulsed. The Nationals lost about 500 men.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
of January, 1861, that Territory was admitted into the Union as a freelabor State. During the political excitement in Kansas there was actual civil war, and some blood was shed. Early in April, 1856, armed men from Southern States, under Colonel Buford, arrived in Kansas. The United States marshal there took Buford's men into the pay of the government, and armed them with government muskets. Lawrence was again besieged (May 5), and on the 21st the inhabitants, under a promise of safety toBuford's men into the pay of the government, and armed them with government muskets. Lawrence was again besieged (May 5), and on the 21st the inhabitants, under a promise of safety to persons and property, were induced to give up their arms to the sheriff. The invaders immediately entered the town, blew up and burned the hotel, destroyed two printing-offices, and plundered stores and houses. The free-labor party were furnished with arms from the free-labor States. Collisions occurred, and on May 26 a fight took place at Ossawatomie, in which the anti-slavery men were led by John Brown (q. v.), where five men were killed. There was another skirmish at Black Jack (June 2)
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
etching along the road back to Bethel Chapel, nearly 3 miles, and remained in that position the whole day. At this point McDowell showed Porter the joint order to proceed to Gainesville, at the same time giving him the information sent to Pope by Buford, of the passage of the fifteen regiments of infantry and 1,500 cavalry through Gainesville that morning. This was the only information that Porter had on the subject of Longstreet's forces, as stated by himself. McDowell, finding that it was imnderstand. In the first place, Porter did not know that Longstreet was there with 25,000 men, nor did he know, unless he made a false statement, anything about the force except what General McDowell told him was his information received from General Buford. Nor was Longstreet confronting Porter. He was 2 1/2 miles away from Porter; was not on the same road that Porter was, but was forming west of the old Manassas Railroad, on Pageland Lane, to the right rear of Jackson's forces, fronting the
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