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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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ed just outside of range and continued there, until, tired of waiting, our men once more resumed their march. Do they forget — or perhaps it were contraband to mention it — the lesson taught their valiant bushwhackers by the Twenty-third Ohio at Buford's gap? Hunter reached Liberty on his retreat Sunday about two o'clock, our forces but a short distance behind. His rear-guard was overtaken about two miles west of Liberty, on the road to Buchanan, and a sharp skirmish ensued, in which we areiller, Major G. C. Hutter, and Doctor W. Owen. There were also others of whose names we have not been informed; and along the entire line of the enemy's march, as far as we can learn, the same scenes of plunder and robbery were enacted. Captain Paschal Buford was stripped of every-thing — cattle, horses, hogs, provisions, &c., all were taken; and so with Captain W. M. Smith, living near Lewry's, and all persons living on or within reach of the road. At Liberty the case was the same, and there<
ntonly slaughtered and left to rot on the ground. Among others we have heard of as being thus brutally despoiled were Mrs Poindexter, Gen. Clay, Capt. Armistead, Dr. Floyd, and N. W. Barksdale, on and near the Forest road; and on the Salem road, Samuel Miller, Major G. C. Hutter, and Dr. Wowen. There were also others of whose names we have not been informed. And along the entire line of the enemy's march, as far as we can learn, the same scenes of plunder and robbery were enacted. Capt. Paschal Buford was stripped of everything, cattle, horses, hogs, provisions, &c, all were taken, and so with Capt. Wm. Smith, living near Lowry's, and all persons living on or within reach of the road. In Liberty the case was the same and there is scarcely a family there who has a dust of meal or a rasher of bacon. Along the road between this place and Liberty, a gentleman who passed over it yesterday tells us that there are at least 100 or more dead horses and mules. When these animals gave