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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Albany, (search)
: (1) to secure a colonial revenue, and (2) to strengthen the bond of friendship between the Six Nations and their neighbors in the West, and the English. Only Governors Clinton and Shirley, two able commissioners from Massachusetts, and one (William Bull) from South Carolina. were present. With the latter came the grand sachem and some chiefs of the Catawbas, a nation which had long waged war with the Iroquois. There was an immense number of the Six Nations present. The royal governors faid South Carolina chose to incur the expense. Delegates from these colonies met the chiefs of the Six Nations (July 5, 1751) and made a treaty of friendship. The King of the Catawbas and several chiefs accompanied the South Carolina delegate (William Bull), and a peace between that Southern nation and the Iroquois was settled at the same time. Fourth colonial convention. There were indications that the Six Nations, influenced by French emissaries, were becoming alienated from the English.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boone, Thomas, (search)
Boone, Thomas, Colonial governor; appointed governor of New Jersey in 1760, and of South Carolina in 1762. He quarrelled with the legislature of South Carolina, which refused to hold any intercourse with him, and in 1763 was succeeded as governor by William Bull.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Catawba Indians, (search)
the powerful league of the Southern Indians in endeavors to extirpate the white people. A long and virulent war was carried on between them and the Iroquois. The English endeavored to bring peace between them, and succeeded. When, in 1751, William Bull, commissioner for South Carolina, attended a convention at Albany, he was attended by the chief sachem of the Catawbas and several chiefs. The hatred between the two nations was so bitter that the English commissioners deemed it prudent to keep the Catawbas alone in a chamber until the opening of the convention, to prevent violence. In the convention, after a speech by Mr. Bull, attended by the usual presents of wampum, the Catawba king and his chiefs approached the grand council, singing a song of peace, and bearing their ensigns—colored feathers carried horizontally. A seat was prepared for them at the right hand of the English company. The singers continued their song, half fronting the old sachems to whom their words were ad
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
dleton1719 Royal governors. Francis Nicholson1721 Arthur Middleton1725 Robert Johnson1730 Thomas Broughton1735 William Bull1737 James Glen1743 William H. Littleton1756 William Bull1760 Thomas Boone1762 William Bull1763 Charles Montague1William Bull1760 Thomas Boone1762 William Bull1763 Charles Montague1766 William Bull1769 William Campbell1775 Governors under the Constitution. John Rutledge1775 Rawlin Lowndes1778 John Rutledge1779 John Matthews1782 Benjamin Guerard1783 William Moultrie1785 Thomas Pinckney1787 Arnoldus Vanderhorst1792 William Bull1763 Charles Montague1766 William Bull1769 William Campbell1775 Governors under the Constitution. John Rutledge1775 Rawlin Lowndes1778 John Rutledge1779 John Matthews1782 Benjamin Guerard1783 William Moultrie1785 Thomas Pinckney1787 Arnoldus Vanderhorst1792 William Moultrie1794 Charles Pinckney1796 Edward Rutledge1798 John Draytonacting1800 James B. Richardson1802 Paul Hamilton1804 Charles Pinckney1806 John Drayton1808 Henry Middleton1810 Joseph Alston1812 David R. Williams1814 Andrew J. PickWilliam Bull1769 William Campbell1775 Governors under the Constitution. John Rutledge1775 Rawlin Lowndes1778 John Rutledge1779 John Matthews1782 Benjamin Guerard1783 William Moultrie1785 Thomas Pinckney1787 Arnoldus Vanderhorst1792 William Moultrie1794 Charles Pinckney1796 Edward Rutledge1798 John Draytonacting1800 James B. Richardson1802 Paul Hamilton1804 Charles Pinckney1806 John Drayton1808 Henry Middleton1810 Joseph Alston1812 David R. Williams1814 Andrew J. Pickens1816 John Geddes1818 Thomas Bennet1820 John L. Wilson1822 Richard J. Manning1824 John Taylor1826 Stephen D. Miller1828 James Hamilton1830 Robert Y. Hayne1832 George McDuflie1834 Pierce M. Butler1836 Patrick Noble1838 B. K. Henneganacti
of the farms already laid out, and then to extend in two divisions between the Rivers, and a third division on the east side Shawshine River, and so every man's lot to follow one another, taking all the three breadths at once, the nearest land to the first centre being still always the next lot in order. The number of every man's lot and quantity of acres is as followeth on the other side. Lot.Acres. 1. Daniell Cheaver20 2. William Clemmance, senr.30 3. Daniell Kempster80 4. William Bull15 5. Roger Bucke10 6. Thomas ffox80 7. Humphery Bradshew15 8. Mr. Boman20 9. William Clemmance30 10. Richard Cutter80 11. Thomas Longhorne60 12. Daniell Blogget40 13. Robert Holmes150 14. Th. Hall20 15. Widow Banbricke40 16. John Jacson50 17. Wm. Homan50 18. Nath. Greene and Mother80 19. Richard ffrench20 20. John Watson80 21. Richard Woodes10 22. John Taylor60 23. Wid: Wilkerson60 24. Lieft. William ffrench150 25. Joseph Miller15 26. Jonath. Hide20
192. In 1665 Capt. Cooke's mill-lane is named in a deed of John Brown, of Marlboroa, to Robert Wilson, conveying his dwellinghouse and barn with six acres of land, J. Adams east, Charles. town line north, Capt. Cooke's mill-lane west, William Bull south, Oct. 27, 1665. See Paige, 502. This mill-lane was a portion of the road laid out from Watertown line to Cooke's Mill at Menotomy in 1638. The mill-lane is now Water street in Arlington. 1691. Sarah Hill, relict and administrawest Mill Brook, east Robert Wilson, south William Cutter, to Mary. Bathrick, alias Boyce, and Samuel Godding, 1724. S. Bull brought up Mary Boyce—his adopted daughter, per his will, 1723,—she marrying John Bathrick, 1724. A lot, formerly of William Bull (see Wyman's Chs. 149), came to S. Bull's possession in 1704-5. Part of S. Bull's estate came into John Cutter's possession, 1737-38; and Elizabeth Bathrick (John's dau.) sold Simon Holden another portion bounded north on Medford lower pond,
orough to Gage, 9 Dec. 1769. refused compliance with the Billeting Act, Lieut. Gov. Bull to Gen. Gage, 24 August, 1769. and whose people enforced the agreement ofthe names of the few enemies to America, who kept aloof from the Association. Bull to Sec. of State, 25 Sept. 1769, and Hillsborough to Bull, 30 Nov. 1769. In Bull, 30 Nov. 1769. In Europe, France studied with care the news from the Colonies, and was convinced of their intrepidity Choiseul to Du Chatelet, Versailles, 8 Sept. 1769. and their anand Colony, and sanctioned a compromise by a majority of one. South Carolina Bull to Hillsborough, 6 Dec. 1769. was commercially the most closely connected with Eoking with impatient anxiety for the desired repeal of the Act complained of. Bull to Hillsborough, 6 Dec. 261. Thus all America confined its issue with Great ondon, 9 December, 1769. Order in Council, 5 April, 1770; Hillsborough to Lieut. Gov. Bull, 12 June, 1770. Many of the patriots of Ireland Gov. Pownall to S.
he cause, ever suspicious of British moderation, and John Mackenzie, whose English education at Cambridge furnished him with arguments for the Colonies. Lieut. Gov. Wm. Bull, private letter to Hillsborough, 5 Dec. 1770. On the thirteenth of December they met the planters, merchants and mechanics of Charleston. Lynch, who hthe Colonies, then having five thousand and thirty white inhabitants, with five thousand eight hundred and thirtythree blacks, State of South Carolina, by Lieut. Gov. Bull, 30 Nov. 1770. commerce resumed its wonted activity in every thing but tea. Lieut. Gov. Bull to the Secretary of State, 13 Dec. 1770. For a moment rumLieut. Gov. Bull to the Secretary of State, 13 Dec. 1770. For a moment rumors of war between Great Britain and the united Kings of France and Spain, Chap. XLVI.} 1770. Dec. gave hope of happy effects. Compare A. Eliot to T. Hollis, 26 Jan. 1771. But this also failed. England, following the impulse given by Lord Egmont during the administration of Grenville, had taken possession of the Falkland Isl
should question the right of such negative. Hillsborough to Habersham, 4 Dec. 1771, and 7 August, 1772. The affections of South Carolina were still more 1772. Jan. thoroughly alienated. Its public men were ruled by their sense of honor, and felt a stain upon it as a wound. A Carolinian in the time of Lyttleton, had been abruptly dismissed from the King's Council; and from that day it became the pride of native Carolinians not to accept a seat in that body. Correspondence of Lieut. Gov. Bull. The members of the Assembly disdained to take any pay for their attendance. State of South Carolina, 1770. Since March 1771, no legislative Act had been perfected, Statutes at large, IV. 331. because the Governor refused to pass any appropriations which should cover the grant of the Assembly to the Society for the Bill of Rights; but the patriot planters ever stood ready to lend their private credit and purses to the wants of their own colonial Agents or Committees. To extend th
rbitrary act of its Council in imprisoning Thomas Powell, the Publisher of the South Carolina Gazette, for an alleged contempt. The Council was a body m which the distinguished men of that Province scorned to accept a seat; its members were chiefly the Crown officers; and they held their places at the King's pleasure. Their power to imprison on their mere warrant was denied; the prisoner was taken before Rawlins Lowndes and another magistrate on a writ of habeas corpus, and was released. Bull to Dartmouth, 18 Sept. 1773. Drayton's Memoirs, i. 118. The questions involved in the case were discussed with heat; but they did not divert attention from watching the expected tea ships. The ideas of Liberty on which resistance was Nov. to be founded, had taken deep root in a soil which the Circular of Massachusetts did not reach. At this moment the people of Illinois were most opportunely sending their last message respecting their choice of a Government directly to Dartmouth himself