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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 24 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 11 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Bull or search for Bull in all documents.

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ith a part of his command, under Wilcox, at Greenville, with two regiments and a battery, under Col. Israel Garrard, 7th Ohio cavalry, at Rogersville, where they were attacked Nov. 6. by 1,200 mounted men under Brig.-Gen. W. E. Jones, acting under the orders of Maj.-Gen. Sam Jones, who struck them at day-light, surprising and easily routing them with a loss of 4 guns, 36 wagons, and 750 prisoners, and creating such a panic at Jonesborough and Greenville that Shackleford's men raced back to Bull's gap, 18 miles, while Jones and his party were making equally good time in the opposite direction, fearing that Shackleford would be upon them in overwhelming force if they did not. This back-to-back race was one of the most ludicrous incidents of the war, though the laugh was rather the heartier on the wrong side. The Army of the Cumberland remaining quiet at Chattanooga, Bragg (or his superiors) conceived the idea of improving his leisure by a movement on Burnside, which Longstreet was
as no longer a force. He had only gathered a small band, with which he occupied Greenville, East Tennessee, when he was surprised Sept. 3. and killed by Gen. Gillem ; who, being apprised of his arrival, had made a forced march of 16 miles from Bull's gap to catch him. Burbridge was detained for weeks in Kentucky, reorganizing and remounting his overmarched force; when he resumed the movement which had been arrested by Morgan's raid. He struck directly for the salt-works at Saltville, neaoff during tile night after the conflict, alleging a lack of ammunition; but, as he left his wounded to the enemy, it would seem that the real difficulty was a superfluity rather than a scarcity at least of balls. Gen. Gillem, still posted near Bull's gap, finding a Rebel force, composed of the brigades of Vaughan and Palmer, in his rear at Morristown, suddenly attacked Oct. 28. and routed them, with a loss on their side of 400 men and 4 guns. Two weeks later, Breckinridge in like manner