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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 24 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 11 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bull or search for Bull in all documents.

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ocured printed in New-Orleans; and Colonel Guppy had requested of General Burbridge lighter duty next day for his men, if possible, so as to allow of their voting and receiving their pay. On the third, at two o'clock A. M., an order came to Captain Bull, chief of the pickets and outposts, to go at once to the picket-line and change the countersign, as one or two deserters had gone over to the enemy. He got back to camp about four o'clock. The long-roll again beat, and the troops fell in and the slightest trace of alarm or excitement. From him we learned that about ninety of the boys were left, and subsequently the number increased to about a hundred--that Colonel Guppy was wounded and a prisoner, Captain Sorenson the same; that Captain Bull was taken prisoner; that the brave and daring soldier, Alonzo G. Jack, and some others were killed, and so of a long list of neighbors and friends. I started at once for the field, but meeting General Washburn, was informed that the whole f
as possible. Sharp skirmishing then ensued, the enemy's line gradually retiring before our skirmishers. The right wing of the skirmish-line was commanded by Colonel Bull, of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth, and the left by Lieutenant-Colonel Baird, of the same regiment, and here it is but just to state that the latter officer won the highest commendation from General Hayes and other general officers for an exhibition of gallantry seldom witnessed on the battle-field. Colonel Bull, it will be remembered, was dismissed for misbehavior in presence of the enemy at the surrender of Harper's Ferry. Assured of his innocence of the charge of cowardice, he ork Volunteers, Colonel Luck; the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New-York volunteers, Colonel Crandell; and the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York volunteers, Colonel Bull, were handled by their commanders with skill and judgment, and behaved splendidly. I am indebted to Captain Joseph Hyde and Lieutenant P. C. Rogers, of my sta