Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for John Bull or search for John Bull in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Concerning Shirts. (search)
in, after a shabby genteel fashion. Not a bit of it. The eve of the Destroying Angel will pierce through broadcloth, and discover our deficiency in Cotton Shirts. The deduction of the Eternity of Slavery from the Necessity of Shirts is not a pleasant one, but we must take it as it comes. Once, in England, they used to put the case a little differently. There it was said that Man could not live by Bread alone, but must have Rum with Sugar in it. Then the formula ran-No Slaves, No Rum and Sugar. D — it, said honest John Bull, in that case, I will fall back upon my Beer and Brandy. This was easy to say, but when it comes to going without a Shirt, John recalcitrates. But, then, if Slavery cannot continue, is doomed and justly doomed by God and Man to extinction, what follows? Why, that we must resign ourselves to Shirtlessness, or at least to Cotton Shirtlessness. There is nothing more to say. The thing is fixed, and very bad it is — for the washerwomen! December 7, 18
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Prophecies and Probabilities. (search)
Rebellion, it is certainly kind in The Times to admit that we shall probably put it down. Great reputations for sagacity have been made before in the same easy way. But we trust that we shall not painfully dishearten holders of government securities when we tell then, that in the opinion of The Times, though we can crush the revolt, we cannot pay our debts; because we are heartily assured that when we have paid. them, the same far-sighted writers will invent a. brannew bugbear. At present, Bull will have it that although victorious we are insolvent. Really, we do not remember anything cooler than this. With an immense commerce, with an unequalled agricultural production, with small foreign liabilities, with a monopoly of two great staples, and the abundant production of a third, with a people eminently skilled, by the confession of their rivals, in the art of accumulating wealth, with a territory capable of limitless production, with great fisheries and great mines, our public pap
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Roland for Oliver. (search)
y entertaining. He has dealt lightly enough, he thinks, with men who, fifty times over, have forfeited their lives. He has n't smoked them to death, as the soldiers of Claverhouse did the Covenanters; he has n't roasted them as the French did the Algerines; he has n't scalped them, and tomahawked wives and mothers, as the Indians under British colors did at Wyoming; he has n't looted private property after the fashion of the English in China; he has n't blown his prisoners from his guns, as Bull did at Delhi; he has resorted to extreme penalties only when the law demanded them, and the commonest punishment which he has inflicted has been banishment to an island, where, only a little while ago, his own soldiers were quartered. It seems to us, after the fullest consideration, that a retort like this is perfectly fair. Gen. Butler may well urge in his own defence that England, with all her immense resources, has never found the work of arresting a rebellion a mere holiday task. He
conscience. It belongs to ecclesiastical establishments — it is something to talk about — it is a handy thing to have in the house — it is an article for which you may have use upon an emergency — but, as for a homely, good, every-day conscience, why you might as well keep an elephant to do odd jobs in the scullery. Bold Britons find conscience a capital thing when they wish to form a Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts — but egad! when you come to Conscience vs. Cotton, John Bull is for the Defendant! Our little plan we trust will make everything easy. It is simply to give the Rebel Slaveholders all they ask — Slaves, the Presidency, the Congress, the Army, the Navy, the Treasury, the Control of Trade, the Direction of the American Church. Will they kindly consent to take us in hand? Will they intimate to our new government what we must do first? Do we kiss their hands or their feet? Or do we knock our forehead three times upon the ground in token of s