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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 2 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Charles Buller or search for Charles Buller in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
nd of Mr. Grote, in whose Personal Life, prepared by Mrs. Grote, he is frequently mentioned. Charles Buller; 1806-1848; distinguished as a member of Parliament by his advocacy of the repeal of the d thought he does not lack boldness. We were at a round table á la Frantaise, and I sat between Buller and Lord Durham. His Lordship said that all the Canadian politicians—Papineau and all—were pett, pamphlet, or book, entitled Six Days in the United States. Calhoun made a great impression on Buller, and also on Mr. Phillips. Both of them speak of him as the most striking public man they have ver met,—remarkable for his ease, simplicity, and the readiness with which he unfolded himself. Buller says that Van Buren had the handsomest shoes and stockings he ever saw! I do not know if I haveacilities for being educated, and in the opportunities open to them of rising in the scale. Charles Buller was best pleased with all below the silk-stocking classes. Seeing what I have in England, I
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
er Review; and was a friend of Mr. Grote, in whose Personal Life, prepared by Mrs. Grote, he is frequently mentioned. Charles Buller; 1806-1848; distinguished as a member of Parliament by his advocacy of the repeal of the corn-laws, and contributo affairs. In language and thought he does not lack boldness. We were at a round table á la Frantaise, and I sat between Buller and Lord Durham. His Lordship said that all the Canadian politicians—Papineau and all—were petty men; and that he shouldgoing to write an article, pamphlet, or book, entitled Six Days in the United States. Calhoun made a great impression on Buller, and also on Mr. Phillips. Both of them speak of him as the most striking public man they have ever met,—remarkable for his ease, simplicity, and the readiness with which he unfolded himself. Buller says that Van Buren had the handsomest shoes and stockings he ever saw! I do not know if I have ever written you about Charles Austin. He is a more animated speaker tha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
rsed through successive Parliaments, and in which his heart was; and now to be overthrown by unexpected opposition from a scholar and friend of scholars will make him furious. It will not be grief, but downright rage that will absorb his soul. I shall send him my sympathy. Macaulay seems a thorough failure; the sky-rocket come down a stick. Milnes, in a letter received yesterday, calls him Poor Macaulay, and says it is a matter of great regret to the Government that they did not take Charles Buller instead. There was, at this time, among scholars much impatience with Macaulay, which was afterwards essentially modified. Talfourd proposed, in 1841, instead of the existing law which limited a copyright to twenty-eight years from the date of publication,one extending sixty years from the author's death.This motion (which Macaulay opposed) failing, the next year Lord Mahon renewed Talfourd's proposition,—substituting, however, twenty-five years for sixty; and was met by Macaulay wit
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
e read his contributions to the American Jurist and the Law Reporter need not be told that, in what may be called the literature of the law, he has no rival among us. Among the biographical notices are those of Lords Hardwicke and Eldon, Mr. Justice Buller, Sir John Mitford, Lord Ellenborough, Lord Thurlow, Sir William Alexander, Mr. Fearne, Chief Baron Eyre, Lord Camden, Mr. Hargrave, Sir Samuel Romilly, Lord Loughborough (Wedderburne),—judges and lawyers who were engaged in the courts durin as a great magistrate that he commands the homage of the bar. It is said that, during the twenty years that he presided in Chancery, three only of his judgments were appealed from, and those were afterwards confirmed in the House of Lords. Mr. Charles Buller has given an interesting sketch of his character; and Mr. Justice Story speaks of him with the warm appreciation of a kindred mind. Lord Eldon. This is the first appearance [Waddle v. Johnson, 1789] in these Reports of one of the most