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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bulwer or search for Bulwer in all documents.

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rom which the storm might possibly come." Now, it matters not whether the advice is given in public or private. The only question is is it wise? As to the effect upon stocks, that is only temporary. The effect of carrying out Mr. Seward's idea will be permanent; and when it is accomplished it will give confidence and a sense of security. It is precisely the advice which we since gave, and for which we were called an alarmist. But events now justify our foresight; and when men like Bulwer talk complacently of the permanent division of the Union into North and South as a fortunate event for England and for Europe, it is high time for us to look to our defences and prepare for any emergency. Let every fort be put on a War footing, and let the works be manned by the local militia;--The better are we prepared, the loss likely will be the powers of Europe to attack us, and it will be far easier for us to settle our quarrel with the South. But if we continue to leave our frontier