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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 26 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 4 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for John Bunyan or search for John Bunyan in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 2 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
his friend and associate, the author. John Bunyan. Wouldst see A man ia the clouds, and hbeginning for a pious life was the youth of John Bunyan. As might have been expected, he was a wia of future retribution to the Oriental mind. Bunyan's World of Woe, if it lacked the colossal archly there were none. It was thus at times with Bunyan. He was tempted, in this season of despair, tly ever worn a form so calm and soothing as in Bunyan's allegory. In composing it, he seems never t Little did the short-sighted persecutors of Bunyan dream, when they closed upon him the door of lujahs and harping symphonies. Few who read Bunyan nowadays think of him as one of the brave old as follows, reminding us of similar enigmas in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress:— Lo! a Riddle for the wings, yet even they did not escape prosecution Bunyan, for instance, in these days, was dreaming, lin points of theology in his bed-chamber; or of Bunyan at actual fisticuffs with the adversary; or o[2 more...]
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
o were thereby permitted to hold their meetings in peace and quietness, used their newly acquired freedom in denouncing the king, because the same key which had opened their prison doors had also liberated the Papists and the Quakers. Baxter's severe and painful spirit could not rejoice in an act which had, indeed, restored him to personal freedom, but which had, in his view, also offended Heaven, and strengthened the powers of Antichrist by extending the same favor to Jesuits and Ranters. Bunyan disliked the Quakers next to the Papists; and it greatly lessened his satisfaction at his release from Bed. ford jail that it had been brought about by the influence of the former at the court of a Catholic prince. Dissenters forgot the wrongs and persecutions which they had experienced at the hands of the prelacy, and joined the bishops in opposition to the declaration. They almost magnified into Christian confessors the prelates who remonstrated against the indulgence, and actually plot