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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Burbridge or search for Burbridge in all documents.

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lle. An officer lately from Port Hudson reports our loss in the engagement there at six hundred. The negroes in the Yankee army were put in front, and they broke at the first fire. As many of them were killed by the Yankees as by the Confederates. The whereabouts of Kirby Smith is still in doubt, some saying that he crossed at Port Hudson with eighteen thousand men, whilst others contradict the news of his arrival. All accounts continue to agree in describing the Yankee loss before Vicksburg as unprecedentedly large — from thirty to forty thousand killed and wounded being the figures given by some correspondents. Five Yankee Generals are said to have been killed, among them Burbridge, who lately distinguished himself a la Butler, in the Deer Creek expedition, visiting private houses and helping himself to plate and jewelry. So far, everything looks promising in that quarter, and a very few days, perhaps hours, will bring us highly exciting news from the Southwest.