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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
f the time, and enjoy their conversation. Every morning we went to return visits; . . . . then to the House or Senate, if there were any debate. At four o'clock, Mr. Webster and Wallenstein came to dinner,—if we dined at home, —so that we were sure of delightful society. To these, I often added one or two others, and thus had at different times, entirely without ceremony, Mr. Poinsett, Joel R. Poinsett of South Carolina, our Minister to Mexico in 1825, and Secretary of War under President Van Buren. Mr. Clay, Mr. Tazewell, Littleton Waller Tazewell, a distinguished lawyer of Virginia, and member of the United States Senate. Mr. Cheves, Langdon Cheves of South Carolina had been Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1815. Mr. King, General Bernard, the Edward Livingstons, General Lafayette, etc. These dinners were as pleasant as anything of the sort could well be, for Mr. Webster was generally very animated, and there was no want of excitement among the rest of them.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
here, give an excellent picture of the condition of the school, and of the character and habits of its distinguished Superintendent. To Mrs. Ticknor. West point, June 5, 1826. This morning the Board met; nine on the ground. General Houston was chosen President, and, as usual, the honor of doing the work fell to me, as Secretary. We have been nine hours at the examination to-day. This evening Governor Morrow, of Ohio, President Bligh, formerly of Transylvania University, and Mr. Van Buren have arrived; a salute has been fired, and all is in motion. When I arrived last evening, I walked up to our old friend Cozzens's; meantime Thayer had gone to the boat to meet me, and we missed one another. In a few moments, however, he came in, and ordered my luggage to his house, where I am established in great comfort and quiet. . . . . The examination is a very laborious business, and will prove, no doubt, tedious to most of those concerned in it. To me, who must keep the records