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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
manded by Colonel Munford, Major W. H. F. Lee's squadron of cavalry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Colonel Gilliam was at Valley Mountain Pass, fifteen miles west of Huntersville, with two regiments, and two other regiments. Burk's Virginia and Colonel —‘s Georgia Regiment were en route from Staunton. The force of Loring on the Huntersville line amounted in round numbers to eight thousand five hundred effective men. The General's staff were particularly active in their efll into an ambuscade, and was killed. He had, by his soldierly qualities and high gentlemanly bearing, gained the esteem of all. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the troops for their courage and patient endurance in this campaign; and Colonels Burk, Gilliam, Campbell, Lee, Munford, Maney, Hatten and Savage were worthy of the gallant fellows that it had fallen to their lot to command. We will now examine into the condition of affairs on the line of the Kanawha. General Floyd entered
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
mies composing the right and center. The average distance of the whole force from Corinth was about 15 miles. From the positions occupied by the right and center armies two principal roads coming from Pittsburg Landing lead in the direction of Corinth. The one on the right crosses Lick Creek 6 miles from its mouth, passes through Monterey a mile south of the creek, and thence in a tolerably direct course to Corinth. The one on the left crosses the creek a mile lower down, at Atkins' or Burk's tan-yard, and unites with the first at Chambers Creek, 7 miles from Corinth. Other roads leaving Monterey bear more to the west and eventually fall into the Purdy road, which passes 2 miles west of Monterey and enters Corinth west of the road above described. Two principal roads lead from Hamburg to Corinth. The one farthest west touches Lick Creek at Greer's, about a mile below Atkins', then bears off south, and unites with the Atkins road a mile and a half from the creek. The othe
an advance upon us. A few well-directed rounds from the section of artillery, with the aid of a heavy skirmish-line, brought them to a halt and put them under cover. It was now near night, and learning from prisoners that Stewart's rebel division was in our front, and Stevenson's near by, and not knowing that it was possible to have any assistance during the night, at dusk I withdrew the forces, leaving the cavalry and Eightieth Illinois infantry at Neil's farm, and retired the residue to widow Burk's house, reported the facts, and rested for the night. February 25th. At early day Brigadier-General Cruft, division commander, promptly came up with the other two brigades, and by his orders all moved forward to Neil's farm, the enemy having reoccupied the ridge where the road passes over toward Davis's house, and for near a mile to the north. Our lines were soon formed, my brigade on the ridge to the right, covering the summit and extending well over the western slope; the Thirtieth
omised him. The ability, order and method exhibited in the management of the wounded elicited the warmest commendation from all our general officers, in which I most cordially join. Notwithstanding the numbers to be cared for, through the energy of Dr. Swift, Medical Director, ably assisted by Dr. Weeds and the senior surgeons of the various commands, there was less suffering from delay than I ever before witnessed. The Eighteenth regiment of Ohio volunteers, at Stuart's Creek, Lieut.-Colonel Burk, commanding, deserves especial praise for the ability and spirit with which they held their post, defended our trains, succored their cars, chased away Wheeler's rebel cavalry, saving a large wagon-train, and arrested and returned in service some two thousand stragglers from the battle-field. The First regiment of Michigan engineers and mechanics, at La Vergne, under the command of Col. Innes, fighting behind a slight protection of wagons and brush, gallantly repulsed a charge from
all about 2,500 effective men. The other wing of the army, under General Loring, in camp at Valley mountain, included the brigades of Donelson, Anderson and Gilham (Twenty-first and Forty-second Virginia and Irish battalion in the latter), Colonel Burk's command and Major Lee's cavalry. About 3,500 men in this division were effective. General Lee went to the front early in August, accompanied by his aides, Col. John A. Washington and Capt Walter H. Taylor, and Maj. W. H. F. Lee's cavalryThe pass, being carried, the whole Confederate force there under Jackson was to sweep down upon the rear of Reynolds at Elkwater, with the co-operation of General Donelson with two regiments, who was to have gained a flanking position. Meanwhile, Burk and Major Lee would move to the west flank of Reynolds, and the rest of the forces would advance by the main road up the valley to attack Reynolds in front. The plan was good, but the signal for the general melee was to be Rust's attack, and unf
n's army, which lost 388 of the total 498. The gallantry of these regiments was particularly commended by Jackson, and it is but justice to say that here the army of the Northwest, so long condemned to suffer the hardships and none of the distinction of war, won at last a permanent title to fame by gaining for Jackson his first victory in the campaign which established his place as one of the world's greatest generals. At the previous battle of Kernstown, the other division of the old army, Burk's brigade (the Twenty-first, Forty-second and First battalion), and Fulkerson's brigade (the Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh), had also fought with great distinction. Thus in a blaze of glory the old Army of the Northwest passes from history. During the remainder of the Valley campaign its regiments were incorporated in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, and the cavalrymen shared the adventures of Ashby. The story of that campaign is elsewhere told, and we return to the consideration of
at Little Rock, in constant apprehension of a movement against that city. General Smith at one time in November seriously contemplated such a movement, and Churchill's, Polignac's, Forney's and M. M. Parsons' divisions were assembled in the vicinity of Camden. Parsons' Texas cavalry was extended from Monticello, Drew county, to Gaines' landing; Wharton's cavalry from Spring Hill to Shreveport; Logan's (Eleventh) Arkansas, mounted, was scouting up through Clark and Saline counties, Hill and Burk north of the Arkansas. November 18th, Churchill's division had moved to Louisville, in La Fayette county, on Red river—Camp Lee. From Price's headquarters, November 30th, General Clark in command of Marmaduke's division, and General Thompson in command of Shelby's, were ordered to Laynesport; and Gurley's Texas cavalry in that direction to cooperate with General Maxey. By direction of General Smith the Ouachita and Little Missouri were made the true line of defense. Colonels McCray and Do
Sheridan of the situation. From this point, he said, General Humphreys can be seen advancing over General Vaughn's farm. The enemy occupied that place two hours ago with artillery and infantry. Griffin is further to the right, and has been urged to push on. He is no doubt doing so. Wright is pushing out on the road you are on, and will go in with a vim any place you dictate. Ord has sent two regiments out to Farmville to destroy the bridge, and is entrenching the balance of his command at Burk's station. If your information makes it advisable for him to move out, notify him, and he will do so. To this Sheridan replied from Flat creek: The enemy's trains are moving on the pike through Deatonsville, in the direction of Burksville station. I am just getting ready to attack them. I have notified General Ord. During the morning it had still been possible that the rebel chief might attempt to make a detour entirely around the national left, and head the remains of his command fo
Sheridan of the situation. From this point, he said, General Humphreys can be seen advancing over General Vaughn's farm. The enemy occupied that place two hours ago with artillery and infantry. Griffin is further to the right, and has been urged to push on. He is no doubt doing so. Wright is pushing out on the road you are on, and will go in with a vim any place you dictate. Ord has sent two regiments out to Farmville to destroy the bridge, and is entrenching the balance of his command at Burk's station. If your information makes it advisable for him to move out, notify him, and he will do so. To this Sheridan replied from Flat creek: The enemy's trains are moving on the pike through Deatonsville, in the direction of Burksville station. I am just getting ready to attack them. I have notified General Ord. During the morning it had still been possible that the rebel chief might attempt to make a detour entirely around the national left, and head the remains of his command fo
ther history of this neglected plantation is involved in gloomy uncertainty. The inhabitants of the city of Raleigh, the emigrants from England and the firstborn of America, failed, like their predecessors, in establishing an enduring settlement; but, unlike their predecessors, they awaited death in the land of their adoption. If America had no English town, it soon had English graves. The original account of White, in Hakluyt, III. 340—348. The story is repeated by Smith, Stith, Keith, Burk, Belknap, Williamson, Martin, Thomson, Tytler, and others. For when White reached England, he found its whole attention absorbed by the threats of an invasion from Spain; and Grenville, Raleigh, and Lane, not less than Frobisher, Drake, and Hawkins, were engaged in planning measures of resistance. Yet Raleigh, whose patriotism did not diminish his generosity, found means to despatch White with supplies 1588. April 22. in two vessels. But the company, desiring a gainful voyage rather th
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