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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Aedanus, 1743-1802 (search)
Burke, Aedanus, 1743-1802 Jurist; born in Galway, Ireland, June 16, 1743; was educated at St. Omers for a priest; emigrated to View of the place where the British laid down their arms. South Carolina, and there engaged with the patriots in thing in the State legislature, he became chancellor of the common-wealth. He died in Charleston, S. C., March 3, 1802. Judge Burke was a thorough republican, and wrote a famous pamphlet against the Cincinnati Society (q. v.) that was translated into (q. v.) that was translated into French by Mirabeau, and used by him with much effect during the French Revolution. Burke opposed its aristocratic features. He also opposed the national Constitution, fearing consolidated power. Burke, Edmund (q. v.) that was translated into French by Mirabeau, and used by him with much effect during the French Revolution. Burke opposed its aristocratic features. He also opposed the national Constitution, fearing consolidated power. Burke, Edmund
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cincinnati, Society of the (search)
incinnati is still in existence, and also State societies. The president-general from 1854 till his death in 1893 was Hamilton Fish, son of Col. Nicholas Fish, one of the original members. In 1900 William Wayne, of Pennsylvania, held the office. The order worn by the president-general at the meetings of the society is a beautifully jewelled one. It was presented to Washington by the French officers. The society met with much jealous opposition from the earnest republicans of the day. Among the most Order of the Cincinnati. powerful of these opponents was Judge Aedanus Burke, of Charleston, S. C., who, in an able dissertation, undertook to prove that the society created two distinct orders among the Americans—first, a race of hereditary nobles founded on the military, together with the most influen- Society of the Cincinnati—Member's certificate. tial families and men in the State; and, second, the people, or plebeians. These suspicions were natural, but were not justif
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
It was determined to make the experiment of tax ing the American colonists in a way which Walpole feared to undertake. A debate arose in the House of Commons on the right of Parliament to tax the Americans without allowing them to be represented in that body. The question was decided by an almost unanimous vote in the affirmative. Until then no act. avowedly for the purpose of revenue, and with the ordinary title and recital taken together, is found on the statute-book of the realm, said Burke. All before stood on commercial regulations and restraints. Then the House proceeded to consider the Stamp act (q. v.). In 1697 the right of appeal from the colonial courts to the King in council was sustained by the highest legal authority. By this means, and the establishment of courts of admiralty, England at length acquired a judicial control over the colonies, and with it a power (afterwards imitated in our national Constitution) of bringing her supreme authority to bear not alone
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
onies, No difficulties can get me to consent to the getting of peace at the expense of a separation from America. The city of London petitioned the King to put an end to the unnatural and unfortunate war ; and in Parliament a great change in sentiment was immediately visible. Late in February, General Conway moved an address to the King in favor of peace. A warm debate ensued. Lord North defended the royal policy, because it maintained British rights and was just. Good God! exclaimed Burke, are we yet to be told of the rights for which we went to war? O excellent rights! O valuable rights! Valuable you should be, for we have paid dear in parting with you. O valuable rights! that have cost Britain thirteen provinces, four islands, 100,000 men, and more than £ 70,000,000 ($350,000,000) of money. At the beginning of March Conway's proposition was adopted. Lord North, who, under the inspiration of the King, had misled the nation for twelve years, was relieved from office, an
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Bruns, J. D., 308, 309, 311 Bryant, William Cullen, 40, 65, 164, 167, 173, 174, 241, 266, 268, 275, 280, 303 Bryant's minstrels, 291 Buchanan, Robert, 271 Bucke, R. M., 272 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph, 206 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 197, 207 Buffon, 201 n. Bugle echoes, 303 Building Eras in religion, 213 Building of the ship, the, 39 Bulletin Universel, 209 Bunner, Henry Cuyler, 242, 243-244, 376, 385, 386, 388 Bunyan, John, 18 Burk, John D., 106 Burke, Aedanus, 180 Burke, Edmund, 96, 99, 104, 203 Burke, William, 56 Bums, Robert, 44, 50, 353 Burns, 45 Burr, Aaron, 200 Burroughs, John, 236, 262 n., 271 Burton, W. E., 59 Burton's gentleman's magazine, 59, 63, 68 Bury them, 284 Bushnell, Horace, 207, 211-213 Butler, Joseph, 196 Butterworth, Hezekiah, 404, 409 Byers, S. H. M., 284 Byrd, William, 149 Byron, 3, 33, 45, 57, 66, 99, 237 By the Potomac, 281 Cabet,Étienne, 188 Cable, George W., 351, 359, 360, 365