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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
iders establishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers on his list of admiring friends Vergennes, Lafayette, Mirabeau, Turgot, Quesnay, La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Condorcet, Lavoisier, Buffon, D'Alembert, Robespierre, and Voltaire. It is absurd to speak of f whiggish temper, two years later to become the fieriest advocate of American independence. In disgrace with the Court, Franklin lingered in England to exhaust the last possibilities of amicable adjustment: petitioning the king, conferring with Burke and Chatham, and curiously arranging for secret negotiations with the go-betweens of the Ministry over the chessboard of Lord Howe's sister. He sailed from England in March, 1775, half-convinced that the Ministry were bent upon provoking an open
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
the House of Commons by introducing and passing a conciliatory resolution; but the offer, unsatisfactory less because of its terms than because of want of confidence in the ministry and the king, had been effectually prejudiced by the passage, in March and April, of bills restraining the trade of the colonies to Great Britain and the British West Indies, and by further provisions for the prosecution of the war. It was on the first of the restraining bills, that relating to New England, that Burke made his great speech on conciliation. In June came the battle of Bunker Hill and the appointment of Washington as commander-in-chief. On 6 July Congress adopted a Declaration of the causes and necessity of taking up arms, Text in W. MacDonald, Select Charters, 374-381. the joint work of Dickinson and Jefferson, and one of the greatest of the state papers of the Revolution. Still protesting that we have not raised armies with ambitious designs of separating from Great Britain, and esta
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
day perceive the sixth flowing from his pen much more readily than the first. But the Farmer's wife dissuades him, unless the plan be followed secretly, so as not to arouse gossip. A chance allusion to the speeches of friend Edmund, that is, of Burke, accords with the attention to style in the letters that follow. If they be not elegant, says the minister, they will smell of the woods, and be a little wild ; but he also assures the Farmer: Nature hath given you a tolerable share of good sensronment which they transmitted to the poets. Yet we recognize in the reports of American travel something ultimate, as did the poets and philosophers. Scattered instances suffice for illustration. In the speech On conciliation with America, Burke, who himself had a share in an Account of the European settlements (1757), betrays an acquaintance with more recent works of a similar kind. To one of Carver's borrowed passages on Indian funeral customs Schiller owes the substance of the Nadowe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
L. a version written in whole or part by John Kerr, in which W. Chapman and later J. H. Hackett played Rip Van Winkle and J. Jefferson played Knickerbocker. This version was very popular and was afterward played in New York. A later play by Charles Burke is an adaptation of this one, with certain changes, notably the preservation of Dame Van Winkle, and the final version of Boucicault and Joseph Jefferson the younger is a development in its turn from Burke's play. The farce as a species ofBurke's play. The farce as a species of comedy in the broader sense has already been spoken of in connection with the treatment of certain comic themes. Payne developed a form of farce largely from foreign sources, and W. E. Burton, by the development of farcical characters like the Toodles out of material whose history goes back to sentimental domestic drama, scored one of his greatest popular successes. The dramatization of American novels calls for a word of comment here. The work of Cooper, W. G. Simms, J. P. Kennedy, C. F.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
odwin, Life, vol. II, p. 36. was not the only one who detected in both the same qualities of mind: obviously a man is not two different beings according to whether he is playing a violin or a cello, singing or talking. Bryant, as Dowden said of Burke, saw the life of society in a rich, concrete, imaginative way ; and not unlike Burke he had, as politician, the poet's generalizing power. But the point here of special interest is the recurrence in his prose so often, when his prose rises to thBurke he had, as politician, the poet's generalizing power. But the point here of special interest is the recurrence in his prose so often, when his prose rises to things in their significance (as apart from their mere relations), of the same imaginative procedure: there is the broad survey, as in the account of the waters of the Mississippi Godwin, Prose, vol. II, p. 269. (themselves introduced as a simile to illustrate the fame of Homer); there are his fundamental metaphors, the grammar of his dialect, as that of the past as a place, occurring in the editorial Godwin, Life, vol. II, p. 235. on the amendment abolishing slavery, which is besides in
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
68, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce, Oliver, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144 Burk, 192 Burk, John, 224, 226 Burke, Charles, 231 Burke, Edmund, 91, 99, 141, 200, 212, 277 Burnaby, Rev., Andrew, 205, 206 Burnett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byroni
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
e won deserved success both as an actor and playwright: to read Jessie Brown; or, the relief of Lucknow (Wallack's Theatre, 22 February, 1858) and The Colleen Bawn (Laura Keene's Theatre, 29 March, 1860), and to compare them with the later Arrah-na-pogue; or, the Wicklow Wedding (London, 22 March, 1865) and The Shaughraun (Wallack's Theatre, 14 November, 1874), is to sound the genial depths of a flexible workman, who could find it as easy to shape a drama for Laura Keene as to re-fashion Charles Burke's version of Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle for presentation by Jefferson (London, Adelphi, 4 September, 1865). One would say of Boucicault, as one would claim of John Brougham, that his local influence was due to local popularity rather than to any impetus he gave to native drama. While Brougham's Po-ca-hon-tas; or, the gentle savage (Burton's Lyceum, 24 December, 1855) and his Columbus et Filibustero (Burton's Lyceum, December, 1857) exhibited the good-nature of his irony; while h
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
clianan, Thomas, 294 Buckland, James, 539 Buckle, 180, 230, 232 Buckminster, J. S., 445 n., 456 Buddha, 213 Buel, C. C., 181 Buffalo Bill. See Cody, William F. Buffalo Gals, 516 Bullard, Frederic Field, 51 Bulletins (Archaeological Institute of America), 491 n. Bulletins (Bureau of Ethnology), 150 Bulwer, 308 Bunch of keys, a, 279 Bunner, H. C., 22, 86, 312 Bunyan, John, 6, 542 Burdette, R. J., 21, 27 Burgess, J. W., 177, 361 Burgoyne, 577 Burke, Charles, 268 Burkle, 583 Burlingame, E. L., 312 Burlington [Iowa] Hawkeye, 21 Burnett, Frances Hodgson, 280, 285, 287, 290 Burs, 34, 60, 61, 69, 109, 115, 369 Burroughs, John, 112, 129, 162, 167 Burton, Warren, 418 Burton, W. E., 267, 268, 269, 270 Bury Me not on the Lone prairie, 514 Busch, 578 Busch und Schtedel, 585 Butcher boy, the, 510 Butler, N. M., 423 Buttner, 578 Byllesby, L., 436 Byron, 9, 54, 55, 69, 96, 276, 369, 454, 546 Byron, Lady, 72