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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
loyal multitudes of the North, now arrayed by the side of the President, where, indeed, I have ever been. If you will bear with me yet longer in allusions which I make with reluctance, I would quote, as my unanswerable defence, the words of Edmund Burke, when addressing his constituents at Bristol. And now, gentlemen, on this serious day, when I come, as it were, to make up my account with you, let me take to myself some degree of honest pride on the nature of the charges that are againsowe duty and love; and behold all legitimate powers, executive, legislative, and judicial, in these States, abandoned and vacated. It only remains that Congress should enter and assume the proper jurisdiction. If we are not ready to exclaim with Burke, speaking of Revolutionary France, It is but an empty space on the political map, we may at least adopt the response hurled back by Mirabeau, that this empty space is a volcano red with flames, and overflowing with lava-floods. But whether we de
words in defence of his public course: Such are accusations to which I briefly reply. Now that we are all united in the policy of Emancipation, they become of little consequence; for even if I was once alone, I am no longer so. With me are the loyal multitudes of the North, now arrayed by the side of the President, where, indeed, I have ever been. If you will bear with me yet longer in allusions which I make with reluctance, I would quote, as my unanswerable defence, the words of Edmund Burke, when addressing his constituents at Bristol. And now, gentlemen, on this serious day, when I come, as it were, to make up my account with you, let me take to myself some degree of honest pride on the nature of the charges that are against me. I do not here stand before you accused of venality, or of neglect of duty. It is not said that, in the long period of my service, I have in a single instance sacrificed the slightest of your interests to my ambition or to my fortune. It is no
eased to have a legal and constitutional existence in every Rebel State. * * But enough. The case is clear. Behold the Rebel States in arms against that paternal government to which, as the supreme condition of their constitutional existence, they owe duty and love; and behold all legitimate powers, executive, legislative, and judicial, in these States, abandoned and vacated. It only remains that Congress should enter and assume the proper jurisdiction. If we are not ready to exclaim with Burke, speaking of Revolutionary France, It is but an empty space on the political map, we may at least adopt the response hurled back by Mirabeau, that this empty space is a volcano red with flames, and overflowing with lava-floods. But whether we deal with it as empty space or as volcano, the jurisdiction, civil and military, centres in Congress, to be employed for the happiness, welfare, and renown of the American people,—changing Slavery into Freedom, and present chaos into a Cosmos of perpet
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
ws the parallel between the American Senator and Edmund Burke. Mr. Sumner will hold some such place in history as that which belongs to Edmund Burke, who is as well known to our times, though he has been in his grave centuries as he is known to the nineteenth century. Burke was in Parliament about twenty-eight years. He held o understand history and politics. Mr. Sumner, like Burke, often was in opposition; like Burke, he would not bBurke, he would not be governed by his party when he thought that party was in the wrong; like Burke, his sympathies were with the oBurke, his sympathies were with the oppressed, and he would labor hard for men whom he never could expect to see, and many of whom never could hear of him; and, like Burke, his works make his best monument, and are integral parts of the history of his country and his age. Finally, as he resembled Burke in the character of his labors, and in his readiness to be the chain death bore more than the usual resemblance to Edmund Burke. With his gray hair resting like a glory on the
ser draws the parallel between the American Senator and Edmund Burke. Mr. Sumner will hold some such place in history as that which belongs to Edmund Burke, who is as well known to our times, though he has been in his grave almost fourscore yearfuture centuries as he is known to the nineteenth century. Burke was in Parliament about twenty-eight years. He held office—pires to understand history and politics. Mr. Sumner, like Burke, often was in opposition; like Burke, he would not be goverBurke, he would not be governed by his party when he thought that party was in the wrong; like Burke, his sympathies were with the oppressed, and he woulBurke, his sympathies were with the oppressed, and he would labor hard for men whom he never could expect to see, and many of whom never could hear of him; and, like Burke, his works Burke, his works make his best monument, and are integral parts of the history of his country and his age. Finally, as he resembled Burke in tBurke in the character of his labors, and in his readiness to be the champion of the wronged and the oppressed, so will he resemble him
l—of weary wakefulness, of cruel pain, till that last moment of mental agony, when his great, pure, honest heart broke. How plainly that old clock repeats to the souls who loved the master of the house: Never here, forever there, Where all parting, pain and care, And death and time shall disappear: Forever there, but never here! The horologe of eternity Sayeth this incessantly, Forever—never—never, forever! The face of Mr. Sumner in death bore more than the usual resemblance to Edmund Burke. With his gray hair resting like a glory on the pillow, he looked very noble, but so tired! We felt amid our grieving that all was well. God had given His beloved sleep. Most of the floral offerings laid on the great Senator's coffin were from his colored friends. They lavished upon him the most rare and costly flowers. On his desk stood a bouquet of roses and azalias, white as the white soul Emerson so honored. Saddest of all sights was his empty chair, draped in mourning, and<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
ibute of an eye-witness of the Boston mob to its victim: We would have ourselves the joy of seeing this work Lib. 7.63. accomplished. Before our eyes close, we wish to see the happy day which shall proclaim liberty to the captive. If it be possible, let the shout of emancipated millions rise, before his ear is dust whose voice first waked the trumpet-note which is rocking the nation from side to side. To him (need I name him?) with at least equal truth may be applied the language of Burke to Fox: It will be a distinction honorable to the age, Speech on Mr. Fox's East India Bill, Dec. 1, 1783. that the rescue of the greatest number of the human race from the greatest tyranny that was ever exercised, has fallen to the lot of one with abilities and dispositions equal to the task;— that it has fallen to the lot of one who has the enlargement to comprehend, the spirit to undertake, and the eloquence to support so great a measure of hazardous benevolence. At the anniversary me
ort, 433.—Letters to G., 1.290, 319, 322, 326, 327, 429, 430, I. Knapp, 1.327, Clarkson, 1.363, B. C Bacon, 1.468; from Cropper, 1.328, C. Stuart, 1.367, J. Kenrick, 1.419. Buffum, James Needham [b. N. Berwick, Me., May 16, 1807], 2.26. Burke, Edmund, 2.130. Burleigh, Charles Calistus [b. Plainfield, Conn., Nov. 3, 1810; d. Florence, Mass., June 13, 1878], career, 1.476; champion of P. Crandall, 416; talk with Mary Emerson, 476; witnesses Boston mob, 2.11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 22, 38, reportsv. 17, 1809; d. Worcester, Mass., Sept. 8, 1881], 2.327. Fowler, Lorenzo Niles [b. Cohocton, N. Y., about 1811], 2.118. Fowler, Orson S. [b. Cohocton, N. Y., Oct. 11, 1809], 2.119. Fox, Charles James [1749-1806], 1.379, 465, tribute from Burke, 2.130.-See, also, the Postscript after the Preface to Vol. I. Fox, George, anti-slavery, 2.110, 423. Francis, F. Todd's vessel, 1.165, carries slaves to New Orleans, 166, 169, 186, 197. Francisco slave case, 1.282. Franklin, Benjamin,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce, Oliver, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144 Burk, 192 Burk, John, 224, 226 Burke, Charles, 231 Burke, Edmund, 91, 99, 141, 200, 212, 277 Burnaby, Rev., Andrew, 205, 206 Burnett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byronism in America, 280 n.
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 5 (search)
ork. He says, We are too much inclined to underrate the power of moral influence. Who is? Nobody but a Revere House statesman. We are too much inclined to underrate the power of moral influence, and the influence of public opinion, and the influence of the principles to which great men — the lights of the world and of the present age — have given their sanction. Who doubts that, in our struggle for liberty and independence, the majestic eloquence of Chatham, the profound reasoning of Burke, the burning satire and irony of Colonel Barre, had influences upon our fortunes here in America? They had influences both ways. They tended, in the first place, somewhat to diminish the confidence of the British ministry in their hopes of success, in attempting to subjugate an injured people. They had influence another way, because all along the coasts of the country-and all our people in that day lived upon the coast — there was not a reading man who did not feel stronger, bolder, and m<
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