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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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th and Wolford's cavalry joined us, raising our effective force to about twenty-four hundred, after deducting Ball's cavalry, which, in obedience to orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detailed from the Forty-second and Fortieth Ohio, and Fourteenth Kentucky each three hundred men, and from the Twenty-second Kentucky two hundred men, and taking the immediate command, supported, however, by Colonel Craner of the Fortieth, and Major Burke of the Fourteenth, and detaching Colonel Wolford's and Major McLaughlin's cavalry up Jennie's Creek, marched up the river road leading to Prestonburg. Early on the morning of the tenth, Colonel Sheldon of the Forty-second Ohio, in command at the camp, received a dispatch from Colonel Garfield stating that he had found the enemy, and asking reenforcements. In compliance with the order, at six A. M. on the tenth, Colonel Sheldon marched with eight hundred men, and all the day they eagerly
Ohio,) to cross the creek, which was nearly waist-deep, and occupy a spur of the high rocky ridge in front, and to the left of my position. In a few minutes, the enemy opened fire from one six and one twelve-pounder. A shell from the latter fell in the midst of my skirmishers on the right, but did not explode. Soon after, the detachment on the left engaged the enemy, who was concealed in large force behind the ridge. I sent forward a reenforcement of two companies to the right, under Major Burke, of the Fourteenth Kentucky, and ninety men, under Major Pardee, of the Forty-second Ohio, to support Capt. Williams. The enemy withdrew his Fifty-fourth Virginia across the creek, and sent strong reenforcements to the hills on the left. About two o'clock I ordered Col. Craner, with one hundred and fifty men from the Fortieth and Forty-second Ohio and Twenty-second Kentucky, to reenforce Major Pardee. Meantime the enemy had occupied the main ridge to a point nearly opposite to my pos
F.--Killed, none. Wounded, Sergeant Eli Coddington, left arm badly shattered and amputated; Privates Edward Edgar, hand, slight; James Coughnour. Company G.--Killed, Private Thomas Snelling. Wounded, Privates Jas. Fox, shoulder, slight; Charles Ford, spent ball in stomach, slight; First Lieut. George Pemberton, spent ball in breast, slight. Company H.--Killed, none Wounded, Sergeant Jacob L. Wright, shot through the hand, slight; Privates Benj. L. Gowing, in foot, slight; Erhardt Burke, in wrist, slight; David Patterson, spent ball in ankle, slight; Burtis M. Gurd, wrist, slightly; Mather Neely, in head, recovering rapidly; George Harris, leg; Daniel B. Widell, shoulder; Lewis C. Clothier, hand, slight. Company I.--Killed, Color--Corporal Willard Hall, shot in the head. Wounded, Privates Henry C. Boyer, shot in cheek, slight; Grannison Reeder, in side by piece of shell. Company K.--Killed, none. Wounded, Privates Wm. Lenty, grape-shot in back of head, morta
aid that after this fire not more than twenty men of one of these regiments were left standing. I learn that the regiments engaged in this terrible contest were Burke's and Fulkerson's, which greatly distinguished themselves. Col. Echols is said to have acted with signal courage, coolness and ability, and I am happy to add thatept a company or two from Maryland. I do not know all the regiments engaged. They were nine in number, but reduced to skeletons by furloughs. Among them were Allen's, Harman's, Fulkerson's, Patton's, Echols', Cummin's, Burke's, and Preston's, (now Moore's.) Allen's, Fulkerson's, Burke's, and Echols', I belive, suffered most. ept a company or two from Maryland. I do not know all the regiments engaged. They were nine in number, but reduced to skeletons by furloughs. Among them were Allen's, Harman's, Fulkerson's, Patton's, Echols', Cummin's, Burke's, and Preston's, (now Moore's.) Allen's, Fulkerson's, Burke's, and Echols', I belive, suffered most.