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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 1 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. N. Price, S. H. Pollock and H. H. Johnson; Acting-Master's Mates, S. S. Willett, G. W. Eckert, C. C. Neil and R. W. Robins; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. B. Dunlap; Acting-Second-Assistant, A. B. Cullins; Acting-Third-Assistants, W. A. Smith, Rufus Burton and J. Hawkey; Gunner, J. M. Hogg. Iron-clad steamer Lehigh. Commander, Andrew Bryson; Lieutenant, Moreau Forrest; Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Longshaw, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. C. lmlay; Acting-Master, Richard Burke; Acting-Ensigns, Edw. Tilghman, C. M. Thwing, J. E. Stickney and F. W. Towne; Acting-Master's Mate, G. W. Leland; Engineers: First Assistant, W. D. Pendleton; Second-Assistant, Alfred Hedrick; Third-Assistant, C. M. Van Tine, J. H. Thomas and S. C. McLanahan. Steamer Paul Jones. Commander, James M. Duncan; Lieutenant, James O'Kane; Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Coles; Acting Assistant Paymaster, J. A Berry; Acting-Ensigns, J. Potts, Chas. Clauson, Henry Hamre and Chas. Weidenbien
and thighs, the left hand carried away; Eli Harwood, Captain's cook, left shoulder and arm badly lacerated; John Ryan, landsman, left half of head carried away; Charles B. Seymour, seaman, upper half of head carried away; Thomas Williams, seaman, spine and ribs carried away; Lewis Richards, seaman, back part of chest and head carried away; Michael Murphy, private marine, right leg and half of the pelvis carried away; William Smith, private marine, struck by a shot and knocked overboard; Richard Burke, coal-heaver, back part of chest carried away, and compound fracture of left leg; Anthony Dunn, first-class fireman, abdomen and chest opened by shell; James McDermott, landsman, left side of abdomen carried away. Wounded — Charles F. Blake, Lieutenant, flesh-wound of right leg, slight; Douglass R. Cassell, Acting Ensign, (in regular navy,) wound of scalp, slight; Daniel C. Brayton, sailmaker, contusion of right fore-arm, severe; Abraham L. Stephens, Acting Master's Mate, wound of fac
of property, no barter of precious blood for filthy lucre. Every thing involved in manhood, civilization, religion, law, property, country, home, is at stake. We fight not for plunder, spoils, pillage, territorial conquest. The government tempts by no prizes of beauty or booty, to be drawn in the lottery of this war. We seek to preserve civil freedom, honor, equality, firesides; and blood is well shed when shed for our family, for our friends, for our kind, for our country, for our God. Burke said: A state, resolved to hazard its existence rather than abandon its object, must have an infinite advantage over that which is resolved to yield, rather than carry its resistance beyond a certain point. It is better to be conquered by any other nation than by the United States. It is better to be a dependency of any other power than of that. By the condition of its existence and essential constitution, as now governed, it must be in perpetual hostility to us. As the Spanish invader
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an er and clear writer he had few superiors. His conversational powers were remarkable. and he was one of the suspected authors of the famous Letters of Junius. He died in Beaconsfield, England, July 9, 1797. Conciliation with the colonies. Burke's great conciliatory speech in the British Parliament, on March 22. 1775, was based on the following proposals which he had previously introduced: That the colonies and plantations of Great Britain in North America, consisting of fourteen sepa