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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 27: recently. (search)
k Family Blocks of Buildings, so popular now in New York, Model Wash-houses, &c., &c., seem like a faint recognition at least of the main principles of Fourierism (whose details we like as little as any one), Opportunity for Work for all, and Economy in the Expenses and Labor of the Family. From across the Atlantic, also, came compliments for the Tribune, In one of the debates in the House of Commons upon the abolition of the advertisement duty, Mr. Bright used a copy of the Tribune, as Burke once did a French Republican dagger, for the purposes of his argument. Mr. Bright said: He had a newspaper there (the New York Tribune), which he was bound to say, was as good as any published in England this week. [The Hon. Member here opened out a copy of the New York Tribune, and exhibited it to the House.] It was printed with a finer type than any London daily paper. It was exceedingly good as a journal, quite sufficient for all the purposes of a newspaper. [Spreading it out bef
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1860. (search)
as especially fond of speaking in debate, and was a very formidable opponent in an argument. This was only the unfolding of a desire and purpose entertained for years to devote himself to the study and practice of the law. He was a natural orator, and spoke with elegance, calmness, and deep impressiveness. His elocution was rich, full, and clear, and brought him one of the Boylston prizes. His pieces for declamation were generally chosen from the great parliamentary and forensic speakers, Burke and Webster being his favorites. In his oratory he prevailed as much by his face and figure as by his voice and gesture. He had a bright, flashing eye, and a commanding presence, a form full of dignity, and a face full of truth. He was chosen Class Orator, and embodied in a production of great simplicity and earnestness the best feelings and hopes of the Class. What shall I say more, except that among his classmates he was universally loved and respected? He never stooped to gain popula
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1863. (search)
n proper light How much there is that ought to woo Our minds to truth, our hearts to right, In these fair scenes we travel through. In College he was a faithful though not a brilliant student. He had always looked forward to the profession of the law, and all his studies tended to prepare him for that. The study of Cicero's pleadings, so tiresome to many, he heartily enjoyed; and his favorite reading was in such works as Brougham's Statesmen, Campbell's Chancellors, Sheil's Irish Bar, Burke, Clay, and Webster. In the Presidential election of 1860 he showed an interest in public affairs which was made more intense during the last Sophomore term by the actual commencement of civil war. He then took an active part in College drill and in guard duty. In July, 1861, he had been unanimously elected the first editor of the Harvard Magazine for his Junior year; and his last vacation was spent in preparation for his duties, and in a pleasant service with other students in making sur
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
rs, but I saw little of them, excepting Mr. Sharp, formerly a Member of Parliament, and who, from his talents in society, has been called Conversation Sharp. He has been made an associate of most of the literary clubs in London, from the days of Burke down to the present time. He told me a great many amusing anecdotes of them, and particularly of Burke, Porson, and Grattan, with whom he had been intimate; and occupied the dinner-time as pleasantly as the same number of hours have passed with Burke, Porson, and Grattan, with whom he had been intimate; and occupied the dinner-time as pleasantly as the same number of hours have passed with me in England. He gave me a new reading in Macbeth, from Henderson, to whom Mrs. Siddons once read her part for correction, when Mr. Sharp was present. The common pointing and emphasis is:— Macbeth. If we should fail? Lady Macbeth. We fail. But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we'll not fail. No, said Henderson, on hearing her read it thus, that is inconsistent with Lady Macbeth's character. She never permits herself to doubt their success, and least of all when a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
n the neighborhood, went home at the end of the evening; but the rest of us sat up late to listen to Sir James, who talked under excitement, to Lord John and Sismondi, of the time of Warren Hastings' trial, and of his acquaintance afterward with Burke, including his visit to Beaconsfield, with great interest and animation. Even after I went to bed these great names, with those of Windham and Sheridan, rang in my ears for a long time, and kept me awake till the daylight broke through my windowThe contrast between these persons. . . . and the class I was at the same time in the habit of meeting at Sir Joseph Banks' on Sunday evening, at Gifford's, at Murray's Literary Exchange, and especially at Lord Holland's, was striking enough. As Burke said of vice, that it lost half its evil by losing all its grossness, literary rivalship here seemed to lose all its evil by the gentle and cultivated spirit that prevailed over it, and gave it its own hue and coloring. The society at Lord Holla
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
father and one to himself, all quite rude. He was the last distinguished person buried here; his son, with the Rockinghams, Fitzwilliams, etc., being deposited in York Minster. The pew of the family is of oak, very rudely carved, and has a shattered look; but it is in the state in which it was when the famous Strafford sat there, and has his arms ill cut in several places. . . . . I could not help imagining how things looked when he was there, and the great Marquis of Rockingham, and when Burke and Fox sat there, as they often did, with the late Lord Fitzwilliam. I had many strange visions about it, and little heeded poor old Mr. Lowe. . . . We lounged slowly home through the grounds and gardens. . . . After lunch, Lord Fitzwilliam said he should go to hear a charity sermon two or three miles off, and asked who would go with him; but all declined except Lady Mary and Mr. Thompson, it being understood that Dr. Dundas would read the evening service in the chapel after dinner. In
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
. . . . How foolish, then, is Sydney Smith in his last letter, to treat is all as pickpockets! He does his cause a great mischief by it; that, perhaps, I could submit to, but I cannot submit to the injury he has done to my cause, and to the cause of all honest men, by exciting passion and prejudice against it. He should have had more wisdom than to do this, more good feeling, more true sympathy with us; for it is we who are to fight this battle for him, if it is to be fought successfully. Burke says, somewhere, that it is never worth while to bring a bill of indictment against a whole people. Certainly, then, it must be a mistake to insult a whole people, more especially if you wish to persuade that people, at the same time, to do something; and most especially if that people is really sovereign, and can do as it likes after all. Nobody in this country can be glad of what he has written, unless it be the few who wish to build up their political fortunes on the doctrines of repudia
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
good many friends, and I lounged with them some time, after which I made a visit to Macaulay, who lives near, and with whom I had a long and interesting talk about Burke, as we sat on his beautiful lawn, where I found him reading. He said that Burke would have made a good historian, judging from his East India speeches and papers,Burke would have made a good historian, judging from his East India speeches and papers, which were drawn up with great labor, and perfectly accurate in their facts. I doubted, and doubt still. Burke was really made for a statesman and orator, and for nothing else. In the evening I went to Lord Granville's, having been obliged to refuse an invitation to dine there two days ago. Sir John Acton, who has been to seeBurke was really made for a statesman and orator, and for nothing else. In the evening I went to Lord Granville's, having been obliged to refuse an invitation to dine there two days ago. Sir John Acton, who has been to see me twice, but whom I have not before met, was there, having arrived four days ago from the Continent. Sir John, now Lord Acton, had been in Boston in 1852. Both he and his mother, Lady Granville, received me with the greatest kindness. Lord Granville came in soon afterwards, wearing the Star and Garter, because he had been din
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Spenser (search)
ion. Yet the praise of well-languaged, since it implies that good writing then as now demanded choice and forethought, is not without interest for those who would classify the elements of a style that will wear and hold its colors well. His diction, if wanting in the more hardy evidences of muscle, has a suppleness and spring that give proof of training and endurance. His Defence of Rhyme, written in prose (a more difficult test than verse), has a passionate eloquence that reminds one of Burke, and is more light-armed and modern than the prose of Milton fifty years later. For us Occidentals he has a kindly prophetic word:— And who in time knows whither we may vent The treasure of our tongue? to what strange shores The gain of our best glory may be sent To enrich unknowing nations with our stores? What worlds in the yet unformed Occident May come refined with accents that are ours? During the period when Spenser was getting his artistic training a great change was going o
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Wordsworth. (search)
free, in a sense higher than political, by showing them that these sources are within them, and that no contrivance of man can permanently emancipate narrow natures and depraved minds. His politics were always those of a poet, circling in the larger orbit of causes and principles, careless of the transitory oscillation of events. The change in his point of view (if change there was) certainly was complete soon after his return from France, and was perhaps due in part to the influence of Burke. While he [Burke] forewarns, denounces, launches forth, Against all systems built on abstract rights, Keen ridicule; the majesty proclaims Of institutes and laws hallowed by time; Declares the vital power of social ties Endeared by custom; and with high disdain, Exploding upstart theory, insists Upon the allegiance to which men are born. . . . . . .Could a youth, and one In ancient story versed, whose breast hath heaved Under the weight of classic eloquence, Sit, see, and hear, unthankful
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