Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Charles C. Burleigh or search for Charles C. Burleigh in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
partition), accompanied by my friend Mr. Charles C. Burleigh. Besides Mr. Burleigh and Mr. GarrMr. Burleigh and Mr. Garrison, the only gentlemen present were Mr. Henry G. Chapman and Dr. Amos Farnsworth, of Groton. The ring (W. L. G., 20th Anniversary, p. 25. So Mr. Burleigh, in Lib. 5.171). In the meantime, the c been impugned ( Garrison mob, pp. 20, 51). Mr. Burleigh could hear likewise (Lib. 5.171). even in tOut with the scoundrel! &c., &c. Turning to Mr. Burleigh, I said— You may as well open the door, and this time [the advent of the Mayor], says C. C. Burleigh (Lib. 5: 171), Garrison had been seated inolence as past for the present. Charles C. Burleigh to Henry E. Benson. Boston, October 26 Henry Benson. that moment, Henry and friend Burleigh burst into the room, Catherine M. Sullivan. ll the dear ladies, with Henry, Thompson, and Burleigh, send the best remembrances to you. Mr. Knappe to G. W. Benson: A letter from friend Burleigh, at the Anti-Slavery Rooms, Ms. Brooklyn, No[5 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
which seemed to me to be bound together more closely in the bonds of brotherly and sisterly love than the Bensons, and it almost seems as if I could feel to my own heart's core the vibration of that string which has now been struck in theirs (C. C. Burleigh to Edward M. Davis, after Henry Benson's death. Ms. Jan. 23, 1837). Mr. Garrison sat down to compose the fifth annual report of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. Not a trace of despondency was to be found in the opening sentence: The xpired, the Executive Committee would not renew it because of his peculiar peace views, and because he declined giving a pledge to confine himself to the discussion of abolitionism (Mss. Oct. 20, 1837, Abby Kelley to W. L. G.; Nov. 13, 1837, C. C. Burleigh to J. M. McKim). He thinks it is unfortunate that the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society is connected at all with the Liberator, as it gives the enemy some advantage in saying that the Society is responsible for all that I write and publish.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
Lundy's effects—his papers, books, clothes, everything of value except his Mexican journal—were there stored, and became a total sacrifice on the altar of Universal Emancipation ( History of Pennsylvania Hall, p. 170; Life of Lundy, p. 303; Lib. 8: 95). Whittier and the Pennsylvania Freeman were also among the sufferers (Underwood's Whittier, p. 144). it was directed against a meeting of women; the mayor was neither eager nor able to put it down. We see again the figures of Garrison and of Burleigh; of Mary Parker, Maria Chapman, Anne Warren Weston, and others of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society who had heard the yells of the gentlemen of property and standing. There is the same spectacle of white women paired with black, as Lib. 8.156; ante, p. 16. they leave the hall and make their way through the rioters in the streets. Again the colonizationists exult in the persecution of the abolitionists, excusing it on the ground of the mixed colors in the audience and on the streets
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
ave alluded, had not necessity been laid upon us by this fresh attack. The truth is, Friend Lundy has a very irritable disposition, which is easily roused; and he finds it impossible to forgive us for venturing to question the propriety of his colonization scheme. To show that his panegyric upon the Abolitionist and the new organization is not of much value, we need only to state, that he took sides with the Clerical Appeal, in his paper at Philadelphia! Under date of Nov. 13, 1837, C. C. Burleigh writes from Philadelphia to J. M. McKim (Ms.): Before you get this you will probably have seen the National Enquirer of last Thursday [Nov. 9], containing the attack on Garrison by Lundy. It creates no small stir and excitement among our good folks in and about the city. The Delaware Co. people are quite up in arms about it, and declare that unless the paper recedes from its position, they will withdraw entirely their support from it. The Philadelphia city and county society are agitat
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
n of Third Party and New Organization: W. L. Garrison, chairman; Ichabod Codding (Maine); Thomas Davis (Rhode Island); Rowland T. Robinson (Vermont); Amos A. Phelps, Abby Kelley (Massachusetts); William L. Chaplin, Lewis Tappan (New York); Charles C. Burleigh, Charles W. Gardiner (Pennsylvania); and Charles W. Denison (New Jersey). On Miss Kelley's confirmation by the meeting the fate of the Society depended. The viva-voce vote being questioned, a count by the tellers showed a total of 1008, Lucretia Mott, Lydia Maria Child, and Maria W. Chapman were made members of the Committee for the ensuing year. Among the resolutions adopted, that on political duty proved the most troublesome to frame, and in its final shape was offered by C. C. Burleigh. It read (a large majority approving): Resolved, That the Constitution of the American Lib. 10.82. AntiSlavery Society does not settle, or attempt to settle, either affirmatively or negatively, the question whether it is or is not the
98; failing health, 120, death, 121; tribute of S. J. May, 121, C. C. Burleigh, 124.— Letters to S. J. May, 1.262, 262, 286, G. W. Benson, 1.2, 114, G. Benson, 2.87, G. W. Benson, 2.41, A. Crandall, 1.344, C. C. Burleigh, 2.39. Benson, Mary [1797-1842], journey to Philadelphia, 2.ris [b. Philadelphia, July 21, 1811], Letters to G., 2.21; from C. C. Burleigh, 2.124. Davis, Jefferson [b. 1808], 2.59. Davis, John [17 Bourne, 2.238; A. Buffum, 1.290, 319, 322, 326, 327, 429, 430; C. C. Burleigh, 2.51; T. F. Buxton, 1.369; M. W. Chapman, 2.224, 240; D. L. Chembers, 399, and proceedings, 406.—Letters from L. Mott, 1.430, C. C. Burleigh, 2.159, 322.— Portrait in A Sylvan City, p. 354. Madison, Ja1.462, 465, Henry Benson, 1.261, 262, 286, G. W. Benson, 1.471, C. C. Burleigh, 1.476. Means, Isaac, instigates Boston mob, 2.10, 43. Mefe, and in Genius of U. E., April, 1830. Unionist, edited by C. C. Burleigh, 1.416. Unitarians, muzzle for the Lib., 1.462, 463, 2.258, <