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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ransfer of the Emancipator—a Ante, 2.342, 343, 351. transfer that was certainly very dishonorable, and wholly unworthy of the character of those who participated in it. Gerrit Smith says the transfer of the Emancipator was a great outrage—told Burleigh so—not publicly (Ms. Feb. 10, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). The transfer of the Emancipator was indefensible (Ms. Nov. 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). Yet I doubt not that the mission of J. A. C. will do much for our persecuted Collishould denounce them as the worst foes of liberty and pure religion, and forthwith renounce them as a Christian church and clergy. To this substitute rallied Parker Pillsbury, Stephen S. Foster, and N. P. Rogers, while Mr. Garrison and Charles C. Burleigh contended for the original formula; the debate raging long, with a drift toward the obnoxious expression in capitals, which was at last abandoned. Speaking for himself, however, and not for the Society, Mr. Garrison presently declared a<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
and generous promoter of the temperance, as lecturer and journalist (Lib. 27: 92). etc., from the cause East; Arnold Buffum, from the West; Thomas Earle, with C. C. Burleigh and J. M. McKim, editors of the Pennsylvania Freeman, and Thomas S. Cavender of Philadelphia; and James S. Gibbons of New York. Mr. Child, in accordance withthe dissolution of the Union our main measure, was the question of the Convention. The debates were very fine. That is, Garrison and Phillips did admirably, C. C. Burleigh very well indeed, on the one side, and Pierpont, Amasa Walker, Hildreth Rev. J. Pierpont. Richard Hildreth. ( Archy Moore The first anti-slavery novel, b conclusion of the struggle for the acceptance of the disunion policy was marked by a bit of scenic effect. On the evening of the last day of the Convention, C. C. Burleigh presented in its behalf to Mr. Garrison, as President of the American Anti-Slavery Society, a silken banner (still preserved), bearing on one side a satirical
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
land, and wields a potent reformatory pen, but his organ of hope is not quite large enough. There seems to be no branch of reform to which he has not given some attention. New Brighton is a small village of eight hundred inhabitants, but there are several other villages in its immediate neighborhood. There have been a good many lectures on slavery given in it by our leading anti-slavery lecturers such as Stephen and A. K. Foster, Burleigh, Pillsbury, Douglass, etc.; but the people C. C. Burleigh, P. Pillsbury. generally remain incorrigible. The secret is, they are much priest-ridden—thus confirming afresh the assertion of the prophet, like people, like priest. The Hicksite Quakers Hosea 4.9. have a meeting-house here, but they are generally pro-slavery in spirit. No place could be obtained for our meeting excepting the upper room of a large store, which was crowded to excess, afternoon and evening, several hundred persons being present, and many other persons not being able
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
hilbrick, Loring Moody, Edmund Quincy, S. S. and Abby Kelley Foster, G. W. Benson, Andrew Robeson, Parker Pillsbury, James and Lucretia Mott, Edward M. Davis, C. C. Burleigh, H. C. Wright, J. Miller McKim, Thomas McClintock, and Joseph C. Hathaway. These were joined later by Samuel May, Jr., R. F. Wallcut, Increase S. Smith, Willmore intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publications. Allusion is here made to the case of Charles C. Burleigh, who in February, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59ertainments, and on Sundays by Mr. Parker's congregation as their meeting-house. The orthodox religious press, as represented by the Boston Recorder, voted Charles C. Burleigh the ablest speaker, yet added: The most influential speaker, whose dictates, whether opposed or not, swayed the whole course of things, was the redoubtable
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
building! Set fire to it! Terrible confusion (Express report, May 9, 1850; Lib. 20: [78]). The victims at this last session were the Rev. Henry Grew, Charles C. Burleigh, and Wendell Phillips. Mr. Burleigh's flowing beard and ringlets and eccentric costume especially evoked the buffoonery of the mob, and harmless personal iMr. Burleigh's flowing beard and ringlets and eccentric costume especially evoked the buffoonery of the mob, and harmless personal indignities. Shave that tall Christ and make a wig for Garrison, Lib. 20:[78]. cried one; while Rynders, with arm around his neck, stroked his beard. Mr.Lib. 20:[78], 106; Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.202. Phillips's irreproachable appearance and famed eloquence did not save him, either, from failure to obtain a hearing, or from filthe now recruited not so much from the Democracy as from the ranks of the Webster Whigs—socially a Lib. 20.93. distinction with some difference. In spite of them Burleigh Lib. 20.89, 90. had his say in splendid fashion; so had Phillips, Garrison, and their colleagues suppressed in New York—Theodore Parker, William H. Channing, an
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
try whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments—I submit: so let it be done! For the text of this fragment of the address we have followed Sanborn's Life of John Brown, p. 584, which is in substantial agreement with R. D. Webb's Life, p. 216. Some slight variations may be noticed in the contemporary reports as published in the Liberator (29.175), in the 27th annual report of the American A. S. Society ( The Anti-slavery history of the John Brown year, of which C. C. Burleigh was the author), p. 109, and in the pamphlet compiled by Thomas Drew, The John Brown invasion (Boston, 1860), p. 32. From Mr. Garrison's speech on the same evening, we select the passage distinguishing himself from the subject of his eulogy: A word upon the subject of Peace. I am a non-resistant— Lib. 29.198. a believer in the inviolability of human life, under all circumstances; I, therefore, in the name of God, disarm John Brown, and every slave at the South. But I do not