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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
her funerals at which Mr. Garrison spoke were those of Joseph and Thankful Southwick, James Brown Yerrinton, William Adams, Bourne Spooner and wife, Mary Ann W. Johnson, William C. Nell, James Miller McKim, Edmund Jackson, Abby May Alcott, Charles C. Burleigh, and as many more not named. His tributes to Richard D. Webb, James Haughton, Charles Sumner, David Lee Child, Gerrit Smith, and Henry Wilson will be found in the N. Y. Christian Union, April 9, 1873, Independent, March 19, 1874, Jan. 7, contains, we are, dear Mr. Garrison, most respectfully and affectionately, your friends. The signatures to this letter included the familiar names of Quincy, Sewall, Chapman, Weston, Whittier, Mott, McKim, May, Smith, Weld, Grimke, Grew, and Burleigh, with those of Henry Wilson, Henry Ward Beecher, Mrs. Stowe, James Freeman Clarke, and others. But the labor asked of him seemed scarcely less formidable to Mr. Garrison than the still unwritten history of the anti-slavery movement, and he pre
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 11: last years.—1877-79. (search)
3. of contrast. He also spent a few days at Osterville, on Aug. 15-20. Cape Cod, and in September went to Philadelphia to see Lucretia Mott and other friends. In June he had been summoned to Florence, Mass., to speak at the funeral of Charles C. Burleigh, Mr. Burleigh came to a premature death through injuries received from a passing railroad train. For more than forty years, wrote Mr. Garrison of him, he was almost constantly in the lecturing field, during which period he travelled maMr. Burleigh came to a premature death through injuries received from a passing railroad train. For more than forty years, wrote Mr. Garrison of him, he was almost constantly in the lecturing field, during which period he travelled many thousands of miles, addressed hundreds of thousands of hearers, cheerfully encountering every hardship, serenely confronting mobocratic violence, shrinking from no peril, heedless of unescapable ridicule (stimulated and intensified by the non-conformity of the outward man in the matter of dress, the wearing of the hair and beard); yet evincing such a mastery of his subject, such powers of argument and persuasion, such force of intellect and breadth of mind, such copiousness of speech and fert