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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Charles Burleigh or search for Charles Burleigh in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ich the cause is advocated Lib. 12.95. by this person or that. I see by the Post, writes George Bradburn to Francis Boston Post. Jackson, on August 7, 1841, that friend Loring does Ms. not choose to be understood as discussing abolition E. G. Loring. topics in the style of our friends Wright and Pillsbury. H. C. Wright, P. Pillsbury. Neither would I, though I am quite a tomahawk sort of Cf. ante, p. 5. man myself. On the other hand, Abby Kelley, writing to G. W. Benson, censures Charles Burleigh for not Ms. Sept. 13, 1841. wanting S. S. Foster sent to lecture in Connecticut, where the new-organized State Society was carrying on an active campaign and the old organization was doing nothing. His [Burleigh's] manner will do much for a certain class, at certain times; but another class, and the same class, indeed, at other times, need Foster's preaching. See Cyrus Peirce's protests against Abby Kelley's and S. S. Foster's resolutions at Fall River, Nov. 23, 1841, and against t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
pon its discussion, pro or con, for reasons that are satisfactory to our own mind. We hope to be always ready to give our cooperation to every Christian and feasible attempt to regenerate and redeem our species, come what may. In December, Charles Burleigh saw him at the Fourierite Convention of Friends Lib. 13.195, 14.3; Ms. Dec. 29, 1843, Burleigh to J. M. McKim. of Social Reform held in Boston, where he spoke, and spoke well, but not in accordance with the views of the Community leaders. Burleigh to J. M. McKim. of Social Reform held in Boston, where he spoke, and spoke well, but not in accordance with the views of the Community leaders. Capital punishment, too, was a frequent topic of the Liberator's editorial page, owing to a rather flagrant clerical demonstration in support of it— Lib. 13.23, 35, 38, 39, 63; 14.23. so that the Massachusetts Legislature was satirically petitioned to make the hangman's office a ministerial perquisite. Finally, amid all these phases of opinion, a revolution was taking place which is thus described in a letter of Edmund Quincy's to R. D. Webb: I am told that Garrison's opinions, as well as