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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Gilbert Burnet or search for Gilbert Burnet in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
be inferred from an anonymous note sent him, in which the writer threatens by the eternal God to cut his throat, if he uttered any more libels upon Dr. Parker. Bishop Burnet remarks that Marvell writ in a burlesque strain, but with so peculiar and so entertaining a conduct that from the King down to the tradesman his books were reae would have reported him as an encourager of the Quakers. But now, John, said the good prelate, I'll burn the warrant against you before your face. You know, Mr. Burnet, he continued, addressing his attendant, that a Ring of Bells may be made of excellent metal, but they may be out of tune; so we may say of John: he is a man ofoy Conference, summoned to advise and consult upon the Book of Common Prayer. His antagonist was Dr. Gunning, ready, fluent, and impassioned. They spent, as Gilbert Burnet says, several days in logical arguing, to the diversion of the town, who looked upon them as a couple of fencers, engaged in a discussion which could not be
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
nest in the declaration, which he made in that unlucky letter which Burnet ferreted out on the Continent, that he was prepared to make large sauthority to the slanderous and false imputations of such a man as Burnet, who has never been regarded as an authentic chronicler. GilbertGilbert Burnet, in liberality as a politician and tolerance as a Churchman, was far in advance of his order and time. It is true that he shut out thiscopal Church, Thomas Clarkson, alluding to this discussion, says: Burnet never mentioned him (Penn) afterwards but coldly or sneeringly, or f Oxford, in his Anecdotes of his Own Times, p. 185, says: I knew — Burnet: he was a furious party-man, and easily imposed upon by any lying s, Arbuthnot, and others—have undoubtedly exaggerated the defects of Burnet's narrative; while, on the other hand, his Whig commentators have eartisanship. Dr. Johnson, in his blunt way, says: I do not believe Burnet intentionally lied; but he was so much prejudiced that he took no p