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The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1862., [Electronic resource], Company D, 11th Virginia Regiment.[For the Richmond Dispatch.] (search)
Poisoning. --The Mobile Tribune makes come corrections in its previous statement of a poisoning case, which was copied in this paper. It says: It appears they were moving the camp that morning, and the 1st Sergeant Harry Lawrence, 1st Corporal Phillip Hannan, and Privates Henry Myer, Peter Burns, and Moses Letzell, were detached from their company (Captain Smith's) to attend to the packing up the camp utensils &c, and in moving things about they found a bottle in a barrel of some articles, which had been thrown there by one of the officers, who, it seems had been sick, and that some quack had prescribed whiskey and yellow Jessamine for the disease, and the above-named gentlemen got hold of it and drank it, thinking it whiskey. The poison took effect almost instantly, as they died in about half an hour afterwards. One drink of it was reserved for a comrade, who, fortunately, was not present to take it. Phillip Bannan, we learn, was a resident of this city; the others we
Sterling Muncy --Peter Burns and James McDonald were before the Mayor yesterday to answer the charge of stealing $180 from William Riley, on Monday night last. Riley boarded with Mrs. Anaker, in Screamersville, where Burns, who has lost his lBurns, who has lost his left arm in battle, and McDonald had been stopping for several days. On Monday last Riley got on a bit of a spree, and finding himself mors than halfsens-over, as evening drew on, proceeded to his boarding-house and soon fell asleep on the floor. Ag the prisoners to assist her in counting it, deposited it in her own pocket for safe-keeping. She then retired, leaving Burns to spend the night in a rocking-chair in her chamber, and McDonald to occupy a soft plank in another room by the side of on, had them both arrested and locked up. On searching the persons of the accused parties $191,90 ware found concealed in Burns's under-clothing, which he said had been paid him the Confederate service, as he could prove; but on McDonald nothing was
Stealing money. --Peter Burns and James McDonald, charged with stealing $800 in money from William Riley, will be further examined before the Mayor to-morrow.
Laid over. --Peter Burns and John McDonald, charged with stealing $800 and a gold watch from William Riley, were before the Mayor last Saturday, and Burns was prepared to prove that he had received a sum of money from a Government paymaster; but owing to the absence of an important witness the examination was postponed till to-day. Laid over. --Peter Burns and John McDonald, charged with stealing $800 and a gold watch from William Riley, were before the Mayor last Saturday, and Burns was prepared to prove that he had received a sum of money from a Government paymaster; but owing to the absence of an important witness the examination was postponed till to-day.
Sent on. --Peter Burns and James McDonald, arrested for stealing $800 from Wm. Riley, appeared before the Mayor yesterday, and were sent on to the July term of the Hustings Court to answer the charge of felony. The Court offered to bail the parties in the sum of $500 each, but neither of them could give the requisite security.
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1864., [Electronic resource], Suspension of the writ of habeas corpus. (search)
Mayor's Court. --Before the Mayor yesterday morning the following cases were heard and disposed of: John Kleff, taken up in the street on Thursday night in a drunk and insensible condition, was before His Honer, but being a member of some military company and expressing a wish to rejoin his command, he was ordered back to his regiment. Peter Burns, a member of the same company, was charged with rifling the pockets of Kleff of all the money he had. The evidence proved that, as the friend of the drunken man, he was only endeavoring to save for him what he had on his person, whereupon he was also discharged and ordered to rejoin his regiment. A mulatto fellow named Wilson was charged with conniving at the escape from his owner of William, the property of James Lyons. Mr. Lyons testified that Wilson, whose wife is owned by him, had been in the habit of visiting his premises. Up to a very recent date he had looked upon him as an honest, worthy negro; but, a short tim