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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Robert Burns or search for Robert Burns in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union men of Maryland. (search)
s made that Maryland must go with Virginia, the Union men found it most difficult to answer in the negative with satisfaction to the people; in truth, while Virginia seemed to hesitate, Governor Hicks deemed it prudent to assent to the proposition, feeling hopeful that the Mother of States would preserve her allegiance. The complications in which our people were involved may be imagined; and a full appreciation of them would bring a favorable judgment both to the State and its Governor. Robert Burns aptly says: What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted. Governor Hicks received a communication from prominent citizens, shortly after the election, in 1860, requesting him to call an extra session of the Legislature, in order to consider the condition of the country, and to determine what course Maryland should take. The members of the Legislature had been elected in the fall of 1859, mainly on State issues, and were not authorized to represent the people on
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
rsonal knowledge of them. The first report of the capture was made to Major Robert Burns, Assistant Adjutant General of General R. H. G. Minty's staff. I drew thinson, Late Adjutant Fourth Michigan Cavalry. Through the kindness of Major Robert Burns, of Kalamazoo, Michigan, I am enabled also to quote the statements of Pris T. Hudson, all of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, together with a letter from Major Burns himself, commenting upon these documents. It will be seen that there is a cen sufficiently humiliated. The letter of Corporal Munger, directed to Colonel Burns, is as follows: Schoolcraft, Michigan, October 29th, 1877. Dear Sir :--I could see it at the time. George Munger. The following letter from Colonel Burns explains itself: Kalamazoo, October 21st, 1877. My Dear General:--Incloimes of our great ride. It is very interesting. Yours, very truly, Robert Burns. Major General J. H. Wilson, St. Louis. After quoting the foregoing doc