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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for Robert Burns or search for Robert Burns in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 2: the secular writers (search)
the early poetry of America, we must remember that the poetic product of England was of secondary value from the death of Milton, in 1674, till the publication of Burns's Scotch poems, in 1786, and of Coleridge's and Wordsworth's lyrical ballads, in 1798. We cannot wonder that in America, during the same period, among all the tasks of colonial and Revolutionary life, no poetry of abiding power was produced. The same year that saw Burns's first poems published (1786) saw also those of the first true American poet, Philip Freneau, who, if he left a humbler name than Burns, as befitted a colonist, at least dictated a line of poetry to each of two leading EnBurns, as befitted a colonist, at least dictated a line of poetry to each of two leading English poets. It has been said that there was no book published in America before 1800 which has now a sure place in general literature. But Freneau before that date gave two lines to general literature which in a manner saved his time, although the lines bore to the general public the names of Scott and Campbell, who respectively
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
taste is much better than his style, and he shows unquestionably that the best English poetry of that day, as was true of the poetry of Tennyson and Browning at a later day, was earlier appreciated in America than at home. The volume opens with Burns's Scots wha hae wia Wallace bled and closes with Coleridge's Ancient Mariner, in its original and more vigorous form; and this at a time when Coleridge's new theory of versification, now generally accepted, that verse should be read by the accents, not by the syllables, was pronounced by the London monthly Review to yield only rude unfashioned stuff; and Burns's poems were described by it as disgusting and written mostly in an unknown tongue. The Lake poets were described by Jeffrey in the Edinburgh Review as constituting the most formidable conspiracy that has lately been formed against sound judgment in matters poetical; and yet they were eagerly received, apparently, in America. It must not be supposed, however, that all the cont
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 6: the Cambridge group (search)
to have been more than any other American the poet of familiar life. What Lowell said dramatically, he could say from experience: We draw our lineage from the oppressed. Compared with him Longfellow, Holmes, even Lowell, were poets of a class. Burns was his favorite poet, and, in later years, he attained, in the naturalness and flow of his song, to something like the lyric power of his master. A few of Longfellow's poems possess this quality, but it pervades the mature work of Whittier. Cothough not a little of his poetry lacks compactness and finish, very little of it lacks power. His rudest shafts of song, as Mr. Stedman has said, were shot true and far and tipped with flame. It is only in this respect that Whittier resembles Burns. His character was as firm, and his life as well ordered, as Longfellow's. It has, indeed, been the fashion among those who remember the famous phrase, Great wits are sure to madness near allied, to condemn all these poets as too respectable, to
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
1, 69-78, 92, 142, 143. Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 129. Browning, Robert, 68, 183, 215, 225, 229, 260-262, 265. Bryant, William Cullen, 81, 100-104. Buckingham, Joseph T., 93. Buel, Rev. J. W., 262. Bunker Hill, Battle of, 61, 135. Burns, Robert, 35, 36, 68, 69, 114, 152, 153. Burroughs, John, 264. Byrd, Col., William, 199. Byron, Lord, 277. Cabot, George, 46, 48. Caleb Williams, Godwin's, 72. Cantata, Lanier's, 224. Carlyle, Thomas, 169, 170, 179, 260, 282. Cary, Alice adi, Irving's, 84, 85. Salut au Monde, Whitman's, 229. Sandpiper, Celia Thaxter's, 264. Sandys, George, 8, 9. Sartor Resartus, Carlyle's, 261. Saturday Review, 268. Scarlet letter, Hawthorne's, 185. Scots wha hae wia Wallace bled, Burns's, 18. Scott, Sir, Walter, 36, 85, 90, 93, 96, 97, 98, 187, 259, 269, 274, 275, 277. Scudder, Horace E., 134. Sedgwick, Catharine Maria, 126, 148. Self-culture, Channing's, 114. Serene I Fold my hands, Burroughs's, 264. Seven Pines, B