Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William Burns or search for William Burns in all documents.

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irst man who signed the roll is a prominent clergyman. The first company of volunteers left Lafayette, Ind., for Indianapolis, at 2 o'clock P. M. to-day. They were escorted to the depot by the Lafayette Artillery; and two companies are nearly full, who will follow in a few days.--Buffalo Courier. An excited secession meeting was held at Baltimore, Md. T. Parkin Scott occupied the chair, and speeches denunciatory of the Administration and the North were made by Wilson C. N. Carr, William Burns, president of the National Volunteer Association, and others.--Baltimore Clipper, April 19. The main entrance to the harbor of Norfolk, Va., was obstructed by the sinking of small boats by order of Governor Letcher.--Baltimore Clipper, April 19. Governor Letcher, of Virginia, issued a proclamation, in which the independence of the Confederate States is recognized, and all armed volunteers, regiments, or companies, are commanded to hold themselves in readiness for immediate orde
Md., on the route to the seat of war. They are well armed and equipped, and have entered the service with the spirit of true soldiers. Whilst at Camden, opposite Philadelphia, where they encamped for some time, they were treated with great kindness by the people of that city.--(Doc. 261.) A balloon ascension for military purposes took place at Washington. The elevation attained was not very great, though it was perfectly satisfactory as an experiment. The aeronauts were Prof. Lowe, Gen. Burns, of the Telegraph Company, and H. C. Robinson, operator. The balloon was connected with the War Department by telegraph. The first message ever telegraphed from a balloon was then sent to the President of the United States by Prof. Lowe. It was as follows: balloon Enterpise, Washington, June 17. To the President of the United States; Sir:--This point of observation commands an area nearly fifty miles in diameter. The city, with its girdle of encampments, presents a superb scen